Oct 17, 2019  
Undergraduate Catalog 2014 - 2015 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2014 - 2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History

  
  
  
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    HIS 303 - Recent U.S. Social History

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course explores major topics in American social history from the Civil War to the present. The course emphasis varies from semester to semester depending on the instructor. Traces major structural change in society, politics, and the economy. Course themes may include social transformations and structural changes in class, race, ethnicity, gender, or religion, among other factors.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
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    HIS 306 - History of Ohio

    [3 credit(s)]
    The early development of Ohio as a territory and a state, transportation problems and economic development, industrialization and urbanization and their economic and social consequences, and ethnic composition.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 311 - Introduction to Public History

    [3 credit(s)]
    An introduction to history as it is applied in non-academic settings such as museums, archives, heritage sites, and community organizations. Examines best practices in oral history, historic preservation, documentary film, and the digital humanities. Involves hands-on participation in ongoing digital curatorial projects.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
  
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    HIS 317 - Civil War and Reconstruction

    [3 credit(s)]
    The American Civil War did more to shape the United States than any other event. It created a united, modern, national state and, most importantly, destroyed legal slavery. The war and Reconstruction forced Americans to examine their ideas about citizenship, nationalism, race, equality, freedom, and the principles embodied in the Declaration of Independence in ways that few other events have ever done. This course examines the military and political conduct of the war; the experiences of black and white Americans during wartime and Reconstruction; the revolution of emancipation; and political, economic, and social Reconstruction. .

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 318 - Black America and Africa

    [3 credit(s)]
    Course explores the ways that African Americans have imagined home by considering the relationship that peoples of African descent in the United States have held with Africa, and how that relationship has figured historically in the making of an African American identity. We will investigate the transformation of African identities in the new world, the formation and transformation of racial nationalism and its relationship to the continent, as well as the connection between the US based freedom movement and African struggles for independence. Throughout the course we will define and redefine what is and has been meant by terms such as the African Diaspora, Cultural Nationalism, black trans-nationalism and Pan-Africanism..

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 319 - History of U.S. Tourism

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course considers the role of tourism and placemaking in American society and culture from the early nineteenth to the early twenty-first century. It emphasizes visionary leaders; the business of tourism; architecture, landscape, and design; cultural representation and performance; and the cultural, social political, and environmental impacts of tourism .

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 321 - U.S. History, 1901-1939

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course is designed to introduce some of the major themes in American History between 1901 and 1939. The course focuses on the impact of progressivism on American society, the extent to which World War I may be considered a turning poin in American history, the social and economic changes of the 1920s and 1930s, and the impact of the Great Depression on American society and politics.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
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    HIS 324 - Defining Black America

    [3 credit(s)]
    Explores the ways in which Americans of African descent have been defined historically by themselves and by whites. The social and political consequences of adopting these definitions are also examined. Topics covered include representations in law and popular/elite culture; racial thought and the rise and fall of slavery/Jim Crow; and self-definitions grounded in, among others, political and class differences.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 325 - Black America Since 1945

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course explores the history of African American politics, communities, and culture in the U.S. since 1945. The content and central focus will vary with the instructor. Examples of course themes include the modern civil rights and black power movements; the black world and the Cold War; black popular culture; gender and sexuality in postwar African America; and black America in the African diaspora.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 326 - African American History Through Sacred Music

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course traces the history of African American sacred music from its African roots, through the nineteenth century spiritual to the twentieth century hymns, gospels and contemporary Christian compositions. This musical heritage will be analyzed within the larger context of African American social and cultural history, with an emphasis on understanding African American church culture as a buffer against racial and other forms of discrimination .

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
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    HIS 328 - Black Gender and Sexuality in U.S. Culture

    [3 credit(s)]
    In this course, we will trace the development of ideas and cultural debates about black gender and sexuality in U.S. culture. We will emphasize several things. One is how whites have used ideas about black man-/womanhood to define what it means to be "black" and the impact these definitions have had on public policy and social practices. Another is how blacks have resisted these characterizations (and the social inequality that often resulted from them), created their own definitions of their gender and sexual identities, and tried to shape public policy and social practices in ways that reflected these self conceptions. A third focus will be debates within black communities regarding appropriate gender and sexual norms, conflicts rooted in class, gender, sexual, and political differences (among others).

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 329 - Black Resistance in the Age of Jim Crow, 1896-1954

    [3 credit(s)]
    African Americans challenged white supremacy long before the emergence of the modern movement for civil rights. This course studies the politics of black resistance during the era of legal segregation-from Plessy vs. Ferguson (1896) to Brown vs. Board of Education (1954). Topics will include anti-lynching, the impact of rural to urban and southern to northern migration, unionization, Garveyism, communism, the roots of black power, and the ways that African Americans confronted the rise of a racist commercial culture.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 330 - History of Ancient Greece

    [3 credit(s)]
    A study of the development of civilization in ancient Greece from prehistoric beginnings until the death of Alexander the Great. Special emphasis will be given to the rise of democracy and its expression in Athens during the Age of Pericles. The nature, extent, and interpretation of ancient evidence for historical research will receive careful attention.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 331 - Rise of Rome

    [3 credit(s)]
    A study of the development of civilization in ancient Italy from prehistorical beginnings until the establishment of the Roman Empire by Augustus. Special emphasis will be given to the foundation legends of the city, and the civil disorders of the final century of the Republic to Empire. The nature, extent, and interpretation of ancient evidence for historical research will receive careful attention. Classical and Medieval Studies course.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 334 - Ancient World at War: Greece and Persia

    [3 credit(s)]
    This on-line course examines one of the most important and definitive clashes between East and West in the ancient world: the Persian Wars. Both the Greek and the Persian sides will be considered. Special emphasis will be placed upon the rise of the Persian Empire under the great kings, the reasons for the conflict, the nature of Greek and Persian culture, politics, and warfare in the fifth century BC, and the use and limitations of the source material.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 335 - Rome and Carthage at War

    [3 credit(s)]
    This online course examines one of the most important conflicts in the ancient world: the Punic Wars. Both sides of the war, Rome and Carthage, will be considered. Emphasis will be upon the rise of the Carthaginian empire, the reasons for the conflict between the two ancient powers, the differences and similarities between Roman and Carthaginian cultures, their interaction prior and subsequent to the conflict, the use and limitations of our source material..
    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 340 - The Roman Empire

    [3 credit(s)]
    The rise and decline of the Roman Empire from the age of Augustus to the end of the fifth century, including the development of Roman government, culture and society. Examines the growth of Christianity and the interaction of the later Empire with the "barbarian" nations, and their effects on the transformation of the western Empire into the late antique world and the early Middle Ages. Classical and Medieval Studies course.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
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    HIS 343 - The Black Death in Europe

    [3 credit(s)]
    Examination of the changes created by the introduction and spread of the Bubonic Plague in a large population. Begins with examination of how diseases are socially, culturally, and historically constructed, then charts the impact of the plague in the first three centuries of its spread. Course analyzes social history of the period and how responses to disease intersected with other Europeanwide developments.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
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    HIS 350 - Golden Age Spain

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course examines the history of Spain from the late-medieval period through the 17th century from social, cultural, political, economic, and religious perspectives. Addresses key developments in Iberian peninsula including encounters with Americas, the rise of absolutism, and the Catholic and Counter-Reformations. Evaluates implications of historical interpretations of both Spain's "Golden Age" and its reputed "decline." .

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
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    HIS 354 - European Women's History

    [3 credit(s)]
    Course will analyze variety of life experiences of European women from 1300 to 1700. Will consider methodological issues that have shaped recent practice of women's history, and will examine the variety of women's roles in late medieval and early modern society including religion, economy, culture, and politics.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 357 - World War I: The Western Front

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course focuses on the social history of the Western Front during World War I (especially Belgium, France and Britain). It aims to go beyond statistics and battle reports and allow students to become immersed in the war experience of the combatants and non-combatants by reading history, novels, poetry, viewing films and images, listening to music, and through class discussion.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
  
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    HIS 369 - Comparative Emancipation: The End of Slavery in the Western Hemisphere

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course studies the European societies in the Western Hemisphere after 1500 built by enslaved Africans and their descendants. The emancipation of these millions of slaves stands as one of humanity's greatest accomplishments. This course introduces students to the ways slaver was eradicated and to the experiences of former slaves in the aftermath of emancipation as they and their former owners struggled to define the meaning of freedom.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 370 - Global Interconnections

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course explores the discipline of world history by highlighting the interconnections between societies and peoples. A primary focus of this course is the way in which historians and social studies teachers define world history for scholarly discussions and in their own classrooms. The course is not necessarily chronological- it is framed by various themes and categories associated with studying world history. Students will be encouraged to think beyond their experiences with American history or western civilization courses to recognize the linkages between historical events and trends around the world. Students will evaluate broader processes of globalization, such as the effects of increasing communication speed and mobility in diverse national contexts, as well as the contribution of these trends to developing transnational communities. This course does not attempt to cover the entire world. It focuses instead on key sites of integration and change such as the emergence of the modem nation/state, labor migrations, trade routes, colonial expansion, revolutions, gender relationships, social

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 374 - 20th Century China

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course will explore the history of China in the twentieth century, focusing on the end of imperial rule, the sources and development of revolution, attempts at socialist transformation, and the course and consequence of economic reform. We will draw upon narrative history texts, biographies, memoirs, and films, as well as translations of original documents. .

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 375 - Pre-Colonial Africa to 1800

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course is a survey of Sub-Saharan African civilizations and the origins of the African Diaspora. Geographic coverage includes the Nile Valley, easdtern Africa and the Horn of Africa, Southern and West Africa, and the central African rain forest. Includes historical analysis of Nubia, Ethiopia, the Swahili, Zimbabwe, Ghana, Mali, Songhay, Asante, Benin, and the Kongo. The Atlantic slave trade is positioned within the historical traditions of African and global history.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 376 - Modern Africa Since 1800

    [3 credit(s)]
    Survey of sub-Saharan African civilizations from the demise of the Atlantic slave trade through the periods of European conquest and colonial rule, the nationalist struggle for independence, and postcolonial African states. Includes African perspectives on colonialism and neocolonialism, including social, economic, political, and cultural initiatives toward independence, modernity and an emerging role in global affairs.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
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    HIS 379 - Collective Survival in the African Diaspora

    [3 credit(s)]
    Course considers the recent history, 1400 to the present, of the African Diaspora in the global community, with an emphasis on the social and cultural histories of African-descended peoples in the Americas. Students will examine recent scholarship on the African Diaspora and conduct their own research, using oral history interviews, archival materials, and other sources .


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 381 - Class, Gender and Sexuality in China

    [3 credit(s)]
    Course uses the categories of class and gender to explore three aspects of Chinese history: the cultural construction of gender and sexuality, the issue of modernity, nationalism and revolution, and the problem of building and partially dismantling a socialist state. It will draw upon poetry, memoirs, anthropological works, and products of popular culture as well as standard historical sources.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 385 - History of the Middle East to1405

    [3 credit(s)]
    "This class examines the most important factors that influenced the historical development of the Middle East between ancient times through the 14th century. Subjects include the historical and cultural foundations laid by the pre-Islamic empires and monotheistic faiths, the coming of Islam and the Islamic conquests, the heights of Islamic civilization, the Crusades and Mongol conquests, the voyages of the great world traveler Ibn Battuta, and daily life in the medieval Middle East. Although this is an upper division class, no previous background knowledge of Middle East History is necessary.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements."


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 386 - History of Islamic Gunpowder Empires, 1301-1798

    [3 credit(s)]
    Between the 14th-18th centuries large Islamic empires competed with one another and the European states for dominance in the Mediterranean and Indian Ocean regions. Those empires that succeeded were known for their creative use of military strategy and the new technology of gunpowder weapons. This course examines the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires as well as other Islamic gunpowder states from this era, including their accomplishments, defeats, social order, leading historical figures, interactions with Europeans, changes in religious life and the economy, intellectual and cultural developments, and legacies in the modern Middle East and South Asia. Although this is an upper-division class, no previous background knowledge of Middle East history is necessary.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 387 - Modern Middle East

    [3 credit(s)]
    This class examines the most important factors that influenced the development of the modern Middle East between the 18th through the 21st centuries. Subjects include colonial empires in the Middle East, the impact of Westernization and modernity, the establishment of nation states, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Iranian revolution, Cold War politics, influence of oil, political Islam and terrorism, America's involvement, and the Middle East post 9/11. Although this is an upper division class, no previous backgroung knowledge of Middle East History is necessary.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 390 - Introduction to Social Studies

    [3 credit(s)]
    By exploring issues of historical content development and historical thinking skills, this course prepares undergraduates to be social studies teachers by exposing them to a broad interdisciplinary perspective on the methods, approaches, skills, and content of the social sciences and History.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 392 - History of South Africa Since 1900

    [3 credit(s)]
    The course examines the history of South Africa from 1900 to about 1994. Particular emphasis on key issues in the making of modern South Africa such as race relations; the economy of South Africa; Afrikaner nationalism; the Apartheid system; African nationalism; and the coming of freedom to South Africa. The course also highlights the relationship between South Africa and its neighbors.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 393 - Special Topics in History

    [3 credit(s)]
    Analysis of crucial problems in history; topic will vary from semester to semester depending on the instructor. Course may be taken for credit more than once, but no single topic may be repeated. Topics will appear in semester course schedule.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
  
  
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    HIS 497 - Readings in History

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Written permission of instructor and chair. Tutorial or seminar work in special areas and subjects not part of the department's regular course offerings; arranged with an instructor on an individual or group basis for 1 to 3 credit hours. May be repeated for credit in a different subject area. History majors may not exceed a total of 6 hours in this course.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HIS 499 - Internship

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Written permission of internship coordinator. Public history internship are site-focused projects that typically take place in museums, historical societies, archives, heritage tourism sites, parks, and community-based organizations. Interns work with experienced practitioners to develop public exhibits and research collections, design and guide public tours, or undertake other history-related projects. Interns gain invaluable career insights by learning how organizations research, collect, preserve, and interpret history in public settings.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses


Honors Program

  
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    HON 101 - Introduction to Honors

    [1 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Honors students or permission of instructor. An orientation course for first-year honors students. Introduces students to campus life including the range of events and services offered on campus and the philosophy, policies and procedures of the University; serves as a forum in which students can ask questions and share experiences with fellow students, faculty, advisors, and mentors; and provides the honors students with a common experience and sense of community.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HON 200 - Universal Honors Experience

    [0 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Honors standing or permission of University Honors Program. The Universal Honors Experience is required of all students in the Honors Program each semester except the first semester of the freshman year. It is intended to build fellowship among students in the Honors Program and to engage students with CSU and the broad Cleveland community. HON 200 is a not-for-credit experience. No more than half of the honors experiences a student in the Honors Program takes may be HON 200 sections. The content of HON 200 will vary considerably from semester to semester. Recent examples include: reading club, film club, service learning, and volunteering for the Model UN. Students may also propose a topic for universal honors experience following guidelines outlined in the Honors Student Handbook.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HON 201 - Universal Honors Course

    [1 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Honors standing or permission of University Honors Program. The Universal Honors Experience is required of all students in the Honors Program each semester except the first semester of the freshman year. It is intended to build fellowship among students in the Honors Program and to engage students with CSU and the broad Cleveland community. HON 201 is a one-credit experience. The content of HON 201 will vary considerably from semester to semester. Recent examples include: Reacting to the Past, Yoga, Viking Expeditions, Drawing, Service Learning and Sports Appreciation.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HON 290 - Honors Internship

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Membership in the University Honors or University Scholars Program and permission of the Honors Director. Written application must be submitted to the Honors Director prior to the beginning of the semester in which the internship will take place. Course consists of field placement in public or private non-profit agencies that combines professional work experience or service activities, typically unpaid, with academic analysis. Requires a minimum of 120 hours per semester on-site at the internship agency. Work expectations for each intern are contracted with instructor and placement supervisor. Regular meetings with instructor, weekly submission of work logs, and substantial (7 to 10-page) final paper required. May be repeated for credit once.


    Click here for the schedule of courses


HPER-Core Curriculum

  
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    HPR 101 - Wellness As A Lifestyle

    [1 credit(s)]
    Introduction to lifestyle behaviors over which people can exert some control; emphasis is on benefits of exercise and fitness, proper diet, and stress reduction, along with management of lifestyle behaviors important for good health and lifetime wellness; personal wellness goals are developed. Wellness course.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    HPR 250 - Diversity & Sport

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course will examine historical and contemporary issues, cultural concerns, politics and practices, in analyzing the progress made in the sporting experiences for minorities and women in the United States. Through the lens of social justice, sport will be explored at all levels from the loss of opportunities in sports for minority children to the illusion of equity in collegiate and professional sports for women. The positioning of sport in society will be examined via the gender-race-power relationships that emerge through sport.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses


HPERD- Special Topics

  
  
  

Humanities

  
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    HUM 293 - Special Topics in Humanities

    [4 credit(s)]
    Written permission from appropriate College program or chair of department prior to registration. Introduction to basic concepts, principles, theories and methods of one of the humanities or an area of humanities specialization. Variable topics. Credits may be applied to one of the programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences with review and approval by the appropriate department. Grading will be on a "Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory" scale.


    Click here for the schedule of courses


Industrial & Manufacturing Egr

  
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    IME 250 - Material Processing And Metrology

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: ESC 270. A manufacturing engineering course emphasizing the fabrication of materials from the processing and equipment viewpoint. This course presents a broad study of the many manufacturing processes utilized in the production of a wide variety of products and components.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IME 251 - Material Process And Metrology Laboratory

    [1 credit(s)]
    Must be taken concurrently with IME 250. Application of the manufacturing process to the transformation of parts. Use of simple production equipment to production of simple parts.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IME 304 - Work Design

    [3 credit(s)]
    Analysis, design and management of industrial work places. Topics include work measurement and methods, basic biomechanics principles, worker behavior and performance, industrial health and safety regulations, ergonomic hazards and ergonomic assessment tools.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IME 305 - Work Design Laboratory

    [1 credit(s)]
    Corequisite: IME 304. Detailed work measurements and methods analyses using left-hand/right-hand charts and multiple activity charts, pre-determined time systems, and work sampling. Exposure to basic biomechanical measurement techniques and physical assessment testing equipment. Ergonomic assessment of industrial tasks using ergonomic assessment tools.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
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    IME 320 - Engineering Experimental Design

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: ESC 310 or equivalent. Practical application of statistical methods to engineering experimental design. Topics include fundamentals of experimental design, two-level multivariable experiments, multilevel multivariable experiments (ANOVA), validation testing methods, and estimation of variance.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
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    IME 465 - Manufacturing Systems Engineering

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: IME 477. Principles and analysis of manufacturing systems; transfer machines, machining centers, flow line systems, and group technology systems; robotics and integrated manufacturing systems; computer-aided programming; robotics applications.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IME 470 - Productions And Operations Control

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: IME 331 and senior standing or permission of instructor. Principles of demand forecasting, production planning and control, master production scheduling, job sequencing, classical inventory control, Materials Resource Planning, and Just-In-Time.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IME 471 - Operational Level Scheduling

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor. Sequencing and scheduling definitions, concepts and scheduling methods most often used in practice. Includes the study of scheduling objectives and performance measures; Gantt charts; resource constraints; and the scheduling of flow shops, job shops, and personnel staffing. Scheduling software is used for instruction, homework and student projects.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IME 475 - System Simulation

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: IME 331. The application of discrete event computer simulation to analyze manufacturing and service problems. Use of commercial computer simulation software to program and solve problems.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IME 477 - Facility Planning

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: ESC 282 or permission of instructor. Analysis and synthesis of production and service facilities and systems with focus on system requirements, flow analysis, activity analysis, and the integration of appropriate material handling systems. Evaluation of facilities designs using qualitative, economic, functional performance measures, and computer-based analytical and design tools.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IME 478 - Facility Planning Laboratory

    [1 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: IME 101 or permission of instructor. Must be taken concurrent with IME 477. Application of material taught in IME 477, including AutoCAD and visFactory software for the planning, drawing and design of manufacturing and service facilities.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
  
  

Information Systems

  
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    IST 203 - Software Tools for Personal Productivity

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: None. Enables students to acquire skills as knowledge worker through effective and efficient use of packaged software. Emphasis is on learning the features of a suite of software including Windows operating environment, word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, Internet, electronic mail, and external database searching.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IST 211 - Fundamentals of Systems Development

    [4 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: IST 203. Introduces the fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming using a contemporary OO language. Topics include classes and objects, data types, control structures, methods, arrays, and strings; the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging programs; definition and use of user-defined classes.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IST 221 - Information Systems in the Organization

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: IST 203. Introduces concepts of information technology, covering both hardware and software. Also introduces roles of information in an organization, information as a resource, and how information systems manage organizational information. Contents include basic computer hardware, O/S functions, file management; basic network components, procedural versus nonprocedural programming, object-oriented programming, types of Information Systems, IS planning, and IS career paths. Personal productivity software, such as spreadsheets and statistical analysis tools, are used to enhance business problem-solving.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IST 300 - Co-op Experiential Learning

    [6 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Approval of the CIS department. Acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program of the CIS department, a minimum of Sophomore standing. Work with a designated faculty advisor to establish objectives for the co-op period, review progress during the work period and review results of the experience against objectives. A student final report is required. Course must be taken during every cooperative education period. Can be take a maximum of 3 times.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IST 305 - Info Tech for Competative Advantage

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: IST 203; must have at least junior standing and be a declared major in the College of Business to be eligible for this course. Presents changing role of information technology in organizations. Discusses role of IT in securing competitive advantage. Contents include groupware, Web authoring tools, electronic commerce, data warehousing and mining. May not be used to satisfy BBA-IS major field requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    IST 311 - Advanced Programming of Bus. Sys.

    [4 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: IST 211. This course is a continuation of IST 211 and is intended to prepare students as advanced end users and developers capable of designing, developing and implementing superior solutions based on a contemporary Object Oriented Programming language. On completion of the course, students will be proficient in designing, coding, debugging, testing, and distributing applications. Coding of applications will include detailed descriptioins of algorithms to perform common programming tasks such as sorting, searching, and hashing. Efficiency issues are also discussed. Students are exposed to database programming techniques using Data Object Model.


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    IST 321 - Systems Analysis Methods

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: IST 221. Introduction to the tools and techniques of systems analysis including requirements determination, use case analysis, process modeling. Object-oriented analysis and design will be incorporated through the use of the Unified Modeling Language and the Rational Unified Process.


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    IST 331 - Modern Database Design & Implementation

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: IST 211 and IST 221. This course introduces database concepts. It focuses on the construction, management, and utilization of relational databases. The student is exposed to an extensive coverage of SQL (Structured Query Language) for basic and advanced queries. Examples of enterprise-level production systems are used for stand-alone and embedded SQL-based applications.


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    IST 341 - Management of Business Networks

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: IST 211,221. Basic knowledge of data communications and networking requirements, including appropriate technologies. Emphasis on analysis and design of networking applications in organizations. Management of telecommunications networks, cost-benefit analysis, and evaluation of connectivity options are also covered. Students learn to evaluate, select, and implement different communications options within an organization. Contents: telecommunication devices, media systems, network hardware and software: network configurations; network applications; acquisition of network resources; distributed vs. centralized systems; architectures, topologies and protocols; installation and operations of bridges, routers and gateways; network administration; performance analysis; privacy, security, reliability; Installation and configuration of LAN and WAN; Internet and intranet.


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    IST 352 - Health Information Technology Applictions

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course enables an IST/CIS major to develop understanding about specific technology used in the Healthcare industry. The course is also a step towards building an undergraduate concentration in Healthcare Informatics. Currently, there is no such course in the department. Cleveland is a leading healthcare market. There exists a need for a trained workforce that can play multiple IT related roles in the healthcare industry.


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    IST 410 - Object-oriented Programming for Information Systems

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: IST 311. The concepts of object-oriented methodologies and programming are presented and reinforced through the Java programming language. Language syntax, error handling, object creation/destruction and memory allocation strategies are explored. Java GUI components, event handling and web-based programming are introduced.


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    IST 420 - Project Management for IS

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: IST 321. Focuses on models used in a software development project, including tools that improve project productivity. Topics include concepts of project management, task scheduling, cost estimation models, risk assessment and software maturity framework. Students will be using tools and cases to gain depth in software project management principles and practice.


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    IST 430 - Knowledge Management

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: IST 221 or IST 305. Introduces concept of Knowledge Management and the systems that enable us to acquire, store, distribute and process knowledge. Define what knowledge is, types of knowledge that exist. Understand how systems thinking is integral to understanding, management of knowledge. Economic issues. Acquiring, storing, distributing, and processing knowledge.


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    IST 440 - Decision Support and Business Intelligence Systems

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: IST 203 and Junior Standing. Introduces decision support systems concepts, methodologies, decision analysis, modeling techniques and integration of intelligent systems. Provides instructions on buliding spreadsheet-based Decision Support Systems (DDS) using Excel Macro and VBA (Visual Basic for Applications). Introduces NET framework to host DSS applications. Illustrates various intelligent techniques of business analytics through case studies from management, business administration and operations research.


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