Oct 17, 2019  
Undergraduate Catalog 2014 - 2015 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2014 - 2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Communication

  
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    COM 330 - Nonverbal Communication

    [3 credit(s)]
    Study of nonlinguistic and paralinguistic aspects of communication, including personal space, body language, eye contact, touching, and paralanguage; survey of research in the field along with class experiences in nonverbal communication.


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    COM 335 - Multimedia Storytelling

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: COM225. This is a course in digital and multimedia journalism. Students will learn in this course include multimedia reporting for the Web by combining text, still photographs, video, audio and interactive graphics.


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    COM 341 - Group Process & Decision Making

    [3 credit(s)]
    Examines the structure and dynamics of groups, the nature and function of leadership, problem-solving and decision-making, communication networks, role differentiation, and group growth.


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    COM 345 - Film Theory

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: COM 221 and either COM 320 or COM 231. This course focuses on theories used in the scholarly analysis of film. The focus of discussion will range from methods of close analysis and basic concepts of film form, technique and style; through industrial/critical categories of genre and authorship (studios, stars, directors); through aspects of the cinema as a social institution, psycho-sexual apparatus and cultural practice; to the relationship between filmic texts and the historical horizon of production and reception.


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    COM 346 - Communication In Organizations

    [3 credit(s)]
    Explores approaches and processes of communication in organizational settings. Specific focus is on the structure and function of messages and information dissemination, as well as application of theory.


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    COM 347 - Political Communication

    [3 credit(s)]
    Introduces students to contemporary and historical scholarship of politics, mass media, and public opinion. Examines such issues as the impact of television on elections, the press and the presidency, political advertising, presidential debates, and opinion polling. Explores theories and research on mass media and elections.


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    COM 348 - Intercultural Communication

    [3 credit(s)]
    Analyzes the cultural dimensions of communication with emphasis on interpersonal and social encounters. Examines the cultural foundations of communication behavior, including ethnicity, cultural sensitivity, personal relationships, group processes, verbal and nonverbal communication, and cultural adaptation. Strategies for effective intercultural communication are also discussed.


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    COM 350 - Persuasive Communication & Attitude Change

    [3 credit(s)]
    Introduces students to the field of persuasion. Examines theories of persuasion, research on persuasive communication, and the formation of social and political attitudes. Topics include the dynamics of attitude change, interpersonal persuasion, brainwashing, subliminal persuasion, and media information campaigns.


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    COM 351 - Post-Production I for Film, TV, and Interactive Media

    [3 credit(s)]
    This introductory editing course will stress the basic rules of Non Linear editing. The Avid Media Composer software will be fully explored. Topics such as digitizing, Time Code, media management, editing function menus and more will be discussed. The purpose of this class is to learn how to operate and understand editing equipment and rules for Television, Film, and Interactive Media.


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    COM 352 - TV Production II

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: COM 204 or permission of instructor. Focuses on operation of video switcher, teleprompter, lighting board and studio cameras. Students learn television program direction and floor managing. Students study multi-camera production, studio and remote multi-camera lighting, and put knowledge to practice in the lab component. Program types studied include persuasive, news/informational, and entertainment.


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    COM 353 - Media Electronics and Technology

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: COM 352. This course will cover history, basic electronic theory and practical application as applied to the design, operation and maintenance of modern video/audio electronic origination, recording, playback and distribution equipment. It is designed for majors and non-majors with technical/engineering interests or backgrounds.


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    COM 355 - Psychological Processing of Media

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): COM 225 and COM 350. Examines how people process information from mass and interactive media, including both traditional and emerging media. The class focuses on both psychological and communication issues, applying theories to media use, impact of media on consumers, and ways to design more effective media environments.


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    COM 358 - Media Law, Economics & Ethics

    [3 credit(s)]
    Examines media law, including First Amendment and administrative law. Focuses on social and political context of free speech. It examines legal constraints for students planning to become professional communicators.


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    COM 359 - International Communication

    [3 credit(s)]
    Surveys the global, regional, and national media systems and practices. Examines the role of the mass media in public diplomacy, national development, national policies, cultural interactions, and perceptions and images people develop about other countries, peoples, and the world. Also examines the future of the New World Information and Communication Order.


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    COM 361 - Social Issues in News

    [3 credit(s)]
    Students get a scholarly understanding of journalism and news. They learn about the social process that explains how news is produced and how social, cultural and political forces shape news. It is a study of journalism as a social institution and explains how a variety of external and internal forces -- economic, political, cultural, organizational and technological -- influence and shape contemporary news media.


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    COM 362 - Health Communication

    [3 credit(s)]
    Focuses on interactions of people involved in the health-care process and the dissemination and interpretation of health-related messages. Provides an overview of provider-recipient communication, communication in health-care organizations, and public health concerns as they relate to physical, mental, and social health issues.


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    COM 363 - Journalism and Media Laboratory

    [1 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: COM 426/COM 455. The laboratory course is a core requirement for journalism and strategic promotional communication majors. The primary objective of the course is to provide hands-on training in managing contemporary digital terrain in media industries. This course must be taken along with journalism and strategic promotional communication capstone courses -- COM 427 and COM 447 respectively.


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    COM 364 - Media Metrics and Analytics

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of COM 226; COM 303; COM 360, and COM 355. This course emphasizes practical aspects of promotional communication. It examines the process by which media campaigns are evaluated in various media environments with an emphasis on social media. The course will explore key social media metrics and analytics to allow students to track digital and social media content. Students will learn how to evaluate a social media campaign's success. The course will also introduce user experience concepts and measurement tools.


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    COM 366 - Communication & Conflict

    [3 credit(s)]
    Approaches to the management of intra-personal, interpersonal, and societal conflict, game theory, frustration and aggression, the etiology of conflict; role playing and case study methods to be supplemented by lecture-discussions and readings.


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    COM 368 - Leadership Communication in Organizations

    [3 credit(s)]
    Introduces theories of organizational leadership, emphasizing the role of communication. Examines how leadership requirements are changing in the global marketplace. Helps students' understand and advance their own leadership skills through case study discussions and developing a personal leadership profile.


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    COM 370 - Communication Technology & Social Change

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course studies the role of communication technologies in societal change. Particular emphasis is placed on new communication technologies (i.e., mobile media, computer mediated communication and robots) and user profiles. Ethical questions raised by the introduction of new communication technologies are addressed.


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    COM 379 - Communication and Negotiation

    [3 credit(s)]
    Examines basic dimensions and theories of negotiation, and develops an understanding of the significance that communication theory has on the study of negotiation. Covers conflict resolution in a wide variety of contexts including interpersonal, organizational, community, international, and public policy.


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    COM 380 - Family Communication

    [3 credit(s)]
    Investigates communication in the family, with emphasis on the functional and dysfunctional ways in which family members relate to one another.


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    COM 388 - The Rhetoric of Black America

    [3 credit(s)]
    Studies the use of rhetoric by Black Americans as an instrument for modifying social, economic, and political conditions. Materials include speeches and documents by Black American spokespersons.


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    COM 393 - Special Topics

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Topics of interpersonal, mass, or telecommunication that change each semester and emphasize skills and communication theory. May be taken for a total of 6 credit hours.


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    COM 394 - Advanced Interpersonal Communication

    [3 credit(s)]
    Provides an in depth examination of the role of communication in establishing and maintaining personal relationships. Critically analyzes leading research and theories in interpersonal communication. Students will Identify and examine a particular research topic of interest, and apply the concepts and principles of interpersonal theory and research to day-to-day interactions.


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    COM 400 - Production Management for Film, TV, and Interactive Media

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): COM 352, or permission of instructor. Analyzes and provides practical techniques and procedures of studio and media production department management. Students learn production systems design, production planning and process, facility bookmaking and budgeting. Also included is scheduling and budgeting for Film production as well as workflow for Interactive media production. The lab component requires participation in Video/Audio Communication Center productions.


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    COM 401 - Advanced Video/Audio Production

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: COM 204, COM 226, COM 351 or COM 225, COM 352, COM 404, or permission of instructor. COM 403 suggested as companion course. Students produce commercial-grade information, educational, training or marketing programs, or broadcast or cable programs for on- or off-campus clients. There is a lab component. Students also study the basic operation of broadcast newsrooms and corporate/organizational video departments. (May rotate instructors from other areas to allow for differing emphasis).

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    COM 403 - Post-Production II for Film, TV, and Interactive Media

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): COM 351 Students learn advanced operation of nonlinear video editing, and digital audio workstations and digital graphics applications. Students study and practice the concepts of sequencing (including cut-ins and cut-aways), montage, time manipulation, rhythm, and transitions.


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    COM 405 - Multi-Media Journalism

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): COM 351, COM 352 and permission of instructor. Students learn to produce news programs and program components through further development of newswriting, news talent, and news production skills. Students also learn of the dilemmas faced every day by working broadcast journalists. Ethics and technologies are studied. Also includes elements of Computer-Assisted Reporting and reporting for the Internet. There is a substantial lab component.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    COM 410 - Film Production II

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): COM 204 and COM 221. This course is a production-based exploration of the development and transformation of cinematic practice as communication and art. It is designed to enable students to explore the development of narrative and non-fiction filmmaking through viewing and, centrally, producing work in both 16 mm and digital video formats. The class is intended to follow a course of study in film techniques and aesthetics, culminating in an original filmic work by the student.


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    COM 411 - Film Production III

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): COM 351, COM 352, and COM 410. This course is a continuation of COM 410, a production-based exploration of the development and transformation of cinematic practice as communication and art. It is designed to enable students to collectively explore advanced filmmaking theory, history, techniques and aesthetics through the making of film/digital media projects in a series of workshops and assignments. The class is intended to follow a course of study in film techniques and aesthetics, culminating in original filmic works produced by student groups in 16mm.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    COM 414 - Film Practicum

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: COM 411. This advanced laboratory course thoroughly examines the filmmaking process from the script to the screen. It is designed so that each student can spend an entire semester exploring, fostering and developing ideas to create an original short film.


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    COM 425 - Publication Design

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: COM 225 and COM 335. This course focuses on understanding basic principles for print and online media graphics and design skills. Students learn how to design and layout print and online publications using design and layout software. It requires application of writing and editing skills learned in the prerequisite courses to class projects.


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    COM 426 - News Media Laboratory I

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): COM 225, COM 326, and COM 425 . The course introduces students to all aspects of news media production from the stage of newsgathering to putting the final news product out in convergence platform that includes print, online and social media. Students learn all aspects of news production, including editing, design, advertising, sales and distribution. This is a class in which students apply journalistic skills learned in the perquisite courses. The course requires of students to work outside the scheduled class times.


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    COM 427 - News Media Laboratory II

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: COM 426. Students learn editorial, leadership, and management skills and knowledge required in running a newsroom that functions in a media convergence environment and puts out news products in print, online and social media platforms. Students apply and further develop journalistic skills learned in the perquisite courses in this capstone class. The course requires students to work outside the scheduled class times.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    COM 428 - African and Middle Eastern Film

    [3 credit(s)]
    Designed to enable students to explore and examine the processes, images, stereotypes, and myths associated with the development of film through a historical and cultural analysis of the film and television industries of Africa and the Middle East. Taught through lectures and intensive examination of films and television programming within a seminar setting.


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    COM 447 - Promotional Production

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): COM 225 , COM226, COM 257, COM 260, COM 303, COM 350, COM 335 COM 355, COM 425 and COM 455. A workshop course in advanced public relations skills. Emphasizes message design and dissemination techniques that range across print and digital media for communication The course will work with actual clients and will include both internal and external organizational publics according to a developed Strategic Communication plan.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    COM 448 - Managing Organizational Teams

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: COM 341 or COM 346 or COM 368, or permission of instructor. Focuses on the structure, functions, and processes of organizational teams and work groups. Special attention is given to promoting effective teamwork in today's organizations through methods of team-building and examining leadership issues confronting teams.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    COM 449 - Advanced Issues in Health Communication

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: COM 362 or COM 380 or permission of instructor. Provides in-depth examination of key theoretic and applied approaches to health communication. Topics include health communication models, doctor-patient communication, gender issues and health, health information campaigns, mass-media influences on health, the role of culture on health and disease, the health-care organization, group influences on well-being, communication and mental health, communication and social health, and the politics of health communication.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    COM 450 - Interactive Media I

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: COM 351. This course introduces the form, techniques, concepts, and aesthetics present in interactive media. It explores a range of media including websites, cinema, games, mobile computing, performance, and emerging forms. The class will utilize social networking, publishing, and distribution websites as support for research, production, and dissemination of multimedia projects.


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    COM 455 - Communication Campaigns

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): COM 224, COM 226 COM 257COM 260 COM 303 COM 350 and COM 355. Introduces students to the fundamentals of communication campaigns. Course content encompasses the role of campaigns in shaping social, cultural, and political agendas; theoretical foundations of communication campaigns; and campaign management techniques. Students use Social Marketing and Strategic Communication principles in analyzing campaigns.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    COM 470 - Interactive Media II

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: COM 450. Through DVDs and other interactive media, guest speakers, lab exercises, and discussions, this course explores the world of emerging media. The technologies are examined and students are introduced to authoring and project management, the most common careers filled by college graduates with training in Interactive Media analysis and production, and how visual storytelling fits the world of Interactive Media.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    COM 475 - Communication and Training in Organizations

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: COM 368 or COM 346 or permission of the instructor. Students develop and present a training program on a communication issue of their choice. This includes researching the topic, developing appropriate training materials, developing appropriate materials and strategies for assessing the programs' effectiveness, implementing the program, and writing a final report.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    COM 485 - Science Writing for the Media

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: COM 326. Introduces students to principles and practices in science journalism. Students will develop their skills in reporting about science and writing news stories about scientific developments. They will hone their skills in effectively communicating science information through different modalities, such as newspapers, magazines, and broadcast media. The course has several parts: a)introducing students to multiple perspectives on communicating science through the mass media, b)developing news gathering skills, such as how to interview scientists and understanding scientific papers conveyed to the media, and c)writing about different aspects of science, including the biological, physical and social sciences. Students will get extensive practice writing science news and feature stories.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    COM 490 - Internship In Communication

    [2-8 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, permission of internship director. Field work with community agencies concerned with promotional communication, communication in organizations, political campaigns, and the media. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours (only 3 credit hours can count toward the major).


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    COM 493 - Special Topics In Communication

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: COM 226, or permission of instructor. Topics in interpersonal and organizational communication, broadcasting, film, journalism, and mass communication that change each semester and deal with a variety of important subjects and issues. May be repeated with departmental permission. This course may be repeated for a total of 12 credit hours.


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    COM 494 - Special Topics in Film, TV, and Interactive Media

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): COM 204, COM 221 and either 320 or 231, or permission of instructor. Explores topics in media arts, audio and video production, digital media, broadcasting, film and the Internet that changes each semester and deals with a variety of important subjects and issues. Each offering will be designated as either Studies or Production in order to count as a major elective in one of those categories for the Film, Television, and Interactive Media degree. May be repeated with departmental permission.


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    COM 496 - Independent Study

    [2-8 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, approval of a department faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours (only 3 credit hours can count toward the major).


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Computer and Information Science

  
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    CIS 151 - Invitation to Computing

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: None. Introduces principles that form the foundation of computer science for students with no prior background in computing. Suitable for students with a non-technical background who wish to explore a career in computing or in a field where computing is used extensively. No prior programming experience is necessary or expected for this course. Key principles of computing are explored through the use of sequential, conditional, iterative logic and the issue of inheritance. Good computing practices are discussed along with problem solving and organization. Students who have completed CIS 260 with a grade of 'C' or higher are not permitted to register for this course. The course includes two lecture hours and two lab hours per week. Labs provide experience with the concepts covered in the lectures.


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    CIS 260 - Introduction To Programming

    [4 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: CIS 151 or ESC 151. Introduction to the principles of computation, problem-solving methods, and algorithm development on a computer using a popular programming language. Development of good programming style and basic skills of designing, coding, debugging, and documenting programs. Topics include sequence, selection, iteration, methods, class, arrays, strings, and basics of inheritance.


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    CIS 265 - Data Structures & Algorithms

    [4 credit(s)]
    Perquisites: CIS 260, MTH 181. This is a continuation of CIS 260. Programming and problem-solving skills are further developed by using language features to implement various data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, trees, and graphs. Topics include additional programming and problem-solving techniques, and sorting, searching, and hashing algorithms.


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    CIS 300 - Co-op Experiential Learning

    [6 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Approval of the CIS department. Acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program of the CIS department, a minimum of Sophomore standing. Work with a designated faculty advisor to establish objectives for the co-op period, review progress during the work period and review results of the experience against objectives. A student final report is required. Course must be taken during every cooperative education period. Can be take a maximum of 3 times.


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    CIS 334 - Computer Organization

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265. Foundations of PC architecture and assembly language. Topics include machine language, hardware fundamentals, memory organization, data representation, addressing modes, and introduction to assemblers. This course contains the first half of the material from CIS 335. May not be used to satisfy BSCIS major field requirements.


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    CIS 335 - Language Processors

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265. Foundation of computer organization and assembly language. Topics include data representation, machine language, hardware fundamentals, registers, and addressing modes. Fundamentals of systems programming including assembly language, assemblers, macro processors, linkers, loaders, and compilers. Examples of language processors are studied on various computers.


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    CIS 340 - Systems Programming

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265. This course serves as the introduction to system-level course. In this course, students will work on Linux systems and use C programming language to develop system programs in Unix/Linux environment. While no C programming skill is required, students are expected to be proficient in at least one high level programming language, e.g., Java.


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    CIS 345 - Operating Systems

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 340. The basic concepts of computer systems, commonly found in most modern computers, are studied. In particular, the class focuses on processes (management, scheduling, synchronization), memory management, I/O management and file systems. Students are expected to work on several intensive programming projects, in addition to regular class assignments.


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    CIS 368 - Object Oriented Design and Programming

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265. Course builds on basic knowledge of data structures and programming in Java. The course revisits concepts of polymorphism and examines how fundamental building blocks of encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism can be put together to build sensible libraries (packages) of classes. Other topics covered in the class include client side programming with in-depth coverage of deep cloning, exception handling, event source/listeners, GUI, reflection, and multithreading, and java sockets. In addition, issues of deployment of java packages, and jar files are discussed.


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    CIS 390 - Introduction to Algorithms

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265, MTH220. This course offers a systematic study of algorithms and their complexity, including sorting, searching, selecting, and algorithms for graphs. Algorithm design methods, including greedy, divide-and-conquer, and dynamic programming are also covered. NP-complete problems will be briefly introduced as the topic of computational complexity. Algorithm implementation is required as a form of programming projects.


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    CIS 408 - Internet Programming

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265. This course introduces website design and web-based applications using several tools and techniques. The course starts with client-side programming. The second half of the course is dedicated server-side development. Topics covered include HTML, DHTML, Cascading Style Sheets, DOM, ASP.NET, Java Script, database connectivity, web parts and web services.


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    CIS 424 - Comparative Programming Languages

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265. A short history of programming languages and coding styles precedes the study of a collection of programming paradigms. The major programming paradigms are surveyed, including procedural, functional, object-oriented, graphical-user-interface based, and logic programming. The relationships between syntax, semantics and the compilation process are investigated.


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    CIS 430 - Data Base Concepts

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265. A comprehensive introduction to database concepts. Emphasis is given to the relational database model. Discussion of data modeling approaches, normalization and database design theory, data definition and manipulation languages, data architecture for storage of large data sets, indexing techniques for effective data retrieval, query processing and optimization, security, concurrency control and recovery mechanisms. Lab experience using various commercial DBMS systems with a focus on 'how to use the tools.'


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    CIS 433 - Systems Analysis Methods

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265. Introduction to the tools and techniques of systems analysis including requirements determination, use case analysis, process modeling. Object-oriented analysis and design will be incorporated through the use of the Unified Modeling Language and the Rational Unified Process. .


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    CIS 434 - Software Engineering

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265. Topics in software engineering and performance engineering, including comparison between structured and object-oriented software development, verification and testing, software design for concurrent and real-time systems, and system re-engineering for increased performance.


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    CIS 442 - Operating Systems II

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 345. Study of operating systems including deadlocks, command procedures. Emphasizes advanced concepts of distributed operating systems as well as client/server models; and study of Unix as a case study of an operating systems both from a system administrator and interprocess communication focus.


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    CIS 454 - Data Communication and Networking

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 345. Data communications: characteristics of physical transmission media, including international standards for data encoding and device interfacing; transmission principles, modems and multiplexors; data link protocols, mechanisms for error detection/correction, and flow control. Computer Networks: broad survey of existing networks; network topology; network layers from the ISO OSI reference model; network programming; analytical tools for network analysis and design.


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    CIS 457 - Computer Graphics

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265. Fundamentals of two- and three-dimensional computer graphics will be covered in this course. Topics include graphics algorithms, transformational geometry, clipping, shading, rendering, and illumination. Students will be expected to develop graphics programs using standard APIs and graphics hardware.


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    CIS 458 - Robotics Programming and Practices

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265 and 340. The course involves the integration of many different Robotics disciplines, including kinematics, vision detection and processing, navigation, path planning, artificial intelligence and real-time software programming. Students have the opportunities to access the primitives of a robot system and then draw inspirations from real world experiments, and finally develop their new design on top of the given software framework.


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    CIS 465 - Multimedia

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 368. Main topics are representation of multimedia data including audio, image and video, and processing and compression of multimedia data. Programming techniques for the three main multimedia data types. Other topics include multimedia standards, multimedia communication and commercial tools for audio, image and video processing.


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    CIS 467 - Introduction To Artificial Intelligence

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 265. The course is an elementary introduction to artificial intelligence, which presents an overview of various domains of the field. Topics studied include search techniques, symbolic algebra, natural language processing, knowledge-based systems, reasoning under uncertainty, machine learning, and some non-symbolic topics such as neural networks and genetic algorithms. Common Lisp, a major symbolic AI language, will also be introduced.


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    CIS 470 - Mobile Application Development

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 345. The course provides an in-depth review of concepts, design strategies, tools and APIs needed to create, test and deploy advanced applications for mobile phones and occasionally connected mobile devices. Topics include: design of mobile user interfaces, application life-cycle, multi-threading, inter-process communication, data persistency, content providers, background services, geo-location and mapping, networking and web services, telephony, messaging, graphics and animation, multimedia, peer-to-peer communication, performance, security. The target computing environment changes overtime; currently the course explores the Android Operating System and its supporting SDK.


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    CIS 475 - Introduction to Computer Security

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 345. This class covers the computer security principles, basic cryptography, authentication, program security, trusted operating systems, computer system attacks and intrusion detection. Linux and other modern operating systems will be used as examples to illustrate the concepts covered in class. Students will develop the skills in basic security system programming through a number of class projects. Basic operating system concepts are required. C/C++ programming skills are required. .


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    CIS 478 - Sensor Networks and Pervasive Computing

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: CIS 340 and CIS 345. This class covers a broad range of topics of the emerging wireless sensor network technologies, including operating systems, radio communication, message routing, time synchronization, localization, energy management, and applications. By using the commercial off-the-shelf wireless sensor motes, students will work on several hands-on projects that involve in developing protocols and applications in TinyOS, a modern embedded operating system. Prior computer system programming (in C/C++) skills and operating system concepts are required.


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    CIS 480 - Introduction to Computer Architecture

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: CIS 335. The course focuses on the design of modern computer systems. Topics include processor and instruction set design; addressing; control structures and microprogramming; memory management, caches, memory hierarchy; interrupts; I/O structures and buses. Upon successful completion of this course, a student will be able to design and program embedded systems.


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    CIS 485 - Senior Project

    [4 credit(s)]
    In this course, students will be expected to design and implement a large group project. The project will be based on knowledge and skills acquired throughout the students' tenure as a CIS or CSC major. Presentations and accompanying reports are required. Upon successful completion of this course, a student will have learned to work effectively on a large project within a group setting, and will have gained experience in reporting on the project during its various stages of development. In doing so, the student will also gain understanding through experience, of the important phases of project development- planning,analysis, design, implementation, and testing. The project will be a substantial addition to the student's portfolio.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    CIS 490 - Foundations of Computing

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: MTH 220 and CIS 335; Mathematics majors may substitute one mathematics course numbered 280 or above for CIS 335. Sets, relations, regular languages, finite automata, context-free languages, pushdown automata, phrase-structure languages, Turing machines, Church's theory, recursion, computability, decidability, computational complexity.


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    CIS 491 - Professional Internship

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Junior Standing and Permission of a CIS Department faculty advisor. Work experience in a professional environment. The work performed must extend the academic curriculum and provide a meaningful learning experience in the student's area of interest. Term paper required. This course may only be taken once.


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    CIS 493 - Special Topics In Computer & Information Science

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Business Major Required for 300/400 Level courses; closed to freshmen and non-degree students and students outside the College of Business. Special topics of current interest in computer and information science. Content varies each offering. May be repeated for credit for a total of 12 credit hours with a change of topic.


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    CIS 496 - Special Study In Computer & Information Science

    [4 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Senior standing, departmental approval. Special research projects in computer and information science. Arranged between student and adviser and subject to departmental approval prior to registration. May be repeated for credit for a total of 12 credit hours with a change of topic.


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    CIS 499H - Honors Thesis in CIS

    [3 credit(s)]
    Requires the honors student to conduct a piece of original research in computer and information science under the supervision of a CIS faculty member. The thesis will be presented orally and submitted as a written report.


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Curriculum & Instruction

  
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    EDB 200 - Teaching As A Profession

    [2 credit(s)]
    Students will examine teaching as a profession -the roles and responsibilities they will encounter in the classroom, the school, and the community. Students will develop a teaching philosophy, examining why they want to be teachers, what will be expected of them in that role, and what being a professional teacher means. Offered every semester.


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    EDB 241 - Rotation & Seminar 1

    [2 credit(s)]
    Students will examine teaching as a profession - the roles and responsibilities they will encounter in the classroom, the school, and the community. Students will participate in an initial introductory field experience, spending 45 hours in field (school and non-school settings) and 22.5 hours in the classroom (primarily in field location) focusing on Context for Learning and Diversity (cultural competence). All students enrolled in this class must have a valid and unexpired Clearance Report from the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on file with the college advising office.


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    EDB 242 - Introduction to Education

    [2 credit(s)]
    Students will examine teaching as a profession -the roles and responsibilities they will encounter in the classroom, the school, and the community. Students will develop a teaching philosophy, examining why they want to be teachers, what will be expected of them in that role, and what being a professional teacher means. Offered with Rotation I.


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    EDB 300 - Educational Technology

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the college as a declared major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher to be eligible for this course. Provides an introduction to instructional technology useful to teachers. Students will use and evaluate media technology, focusing on ways to effectively integrate technology and other media resources into the instructional program. Offered every semester.


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    EDB 301 - Social Foundations of Education

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the college as a declared major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher to be eligible for this course. An examination of the school in its cultural context. Emphasis is on the historical, social, economic, and technological forces that shape current educational discourse. Special emphasis is placed on the role of diversity in educational decision-making. Offered every semester.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    EDB 302 - Psychological Foundations of Education

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: PSY 220 or PSY 221; Must be admitted to the college as a declared major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher to be eligible for this course. An analysis of the nature of human learning and development and their relationship to the process of education and to instruction. Emphasis is on current theories and research relating to the contextual nature of human learning to instructional practice. Offered every semester.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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    EDB 303 - History and Philosophy of Middle School: Teaching and Management in Context

    [4 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: EDB 200, EDB 300, EDB 301, EDB 302. Must be admitted to the college as a declared major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher to be eligible for this course. This course addresses middle school historical and philosophical foundations in the context of teaching and classroom management. Students will examine the historical dimensions of the structure and curriculum of middle schools. Philosophical issues such as tracking, interdisciplinary curriculum, and experiential learning will be discussed. This course combines educational theory with actual classroom practice. Students will identify and plan appropriate instructional strategies for diverse learners in middle-school contexts and identify appropriate classroom management skills and techniques for adolescents. Students wil examine a variety of programs and strategies such as adviser-advisee, interdisciplinary team teaching, and integrated curriculum planning. A field experience will provide students with an opportunity to practice and reflect upon their own teaching.


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    EDB 305 - Teaching & Management In Secondary School

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: EDB 200, EDB 300, EDB 301, EDB 302. Must be admitted to the college as a declared major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher to be eligible for this course. The primary purpose of this course is to combine educational theory with actual classroom practice. Students will identify and plan appropriate instructional strategies for diverse learners and secondary school contexts and identify appropriate classroom management skills and techniques for secondary students. Students will examine a variety of classroom management techniques and develop a disciplinary unit of instruction to implement. A field experience will provide students with an opportunity to reflect upon their own teaching.


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    EDB 400 - Classroom Assessment

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequsite: EDB 303 or EDB 305. Must be admitted to the college as a declared major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher to be eligible for this course. Students will examine their roles as teachers, colleagues, reflective practitioners, and advocates as they develop and communicate the result of classroom assessments to students, their parents, colleagues, and other community members. They will develop techniques for assessment of student learning that can be used to improve teaching and achievement and effective communication with students, parents, teachers, administrators, community members, and other professional educators. Students will explore methods for collaborating with other professionals to address the inequities related to differences of special need, race, class, and gender.


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    EDB 451 - Individual Projects In Education

    [4 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson. An independent project in a selected area of education. Project must be approved by department chairperson and advisor. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours with change of topic.


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    EDB 472 - Statistics for Health and Human Services

    [3 credit(s)]
    An introduction to basic statistical methods. There is an emphasis on calculating, understanding, and interpreting introductory parametric and non-parametric statistical techniques.


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    EDB 495 - Seminar in Classroom Inquiry

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. Must be admitted to the college as a declared major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher to be eligible for this course. Introduces pre-service educators to the process of classroom inquiry and reflection through a collaborative action research project. Specifically, the focus is to develop methods consistent with critically reflective practices that support effective teaching and enhance student learning. By employing a systematic process of classroom inquiry, participants will learn how to develop classroom-based research by searching for relevant literature, design appropriate data collection methods, analyze, interpret and reflect upon the results, and provide a discussion of the finding s related to the classroom and teacher practice. In addition, participants will also share the findings with colleagues and submit an article to the online CSU journal Teacher Research Journal. This course serves as the capstone course for the upper division honors program for teacher license candidates.


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Dance (Physical Education)

  
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    DAN 100 - Performance Practicum

    [1 credit(s)]
    Introduction to the performance techniques of live dance production. Learning, rehearsing, and performing a contemporary dance work in an informal and/or formal setting. This course may be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours.


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