May 23, 2019  
Undergraduate Catalog 2014 - 2015 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2014 - 2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

English

  
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    ENG 241 - Introduction to Fiction

    [3 credit(s)]
    Pre-requisites: ENG 101 & ENG 102. An introduction to analyzing and writing about literature, focusing on the genre of fiction. Students will learn techniques for reading analytically and critically and for writing critical/research papers on fictional works. The course will examine the generic characteristics of a variety of types of fiction, including works written in English by men and women from diverse ethnic/cultural groups and some translated works illustrating various national traditions. Alternate for ENG 102 with approval. Students must receive a C or better in this course for it to count towards the major.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 241H - H:Writing Lit.:Fiction

    [3 credit(s)]


    This course teaches students how to analyze, discuss and write critically about fiction and drama at a level appropriate for honors level English majors. While all sections of ENG 241 teach students the skills of critical thinking and writing about literature, this honors course will also help students understand the histories and ideologies behind the types of analyses they are learning to perform on literature. Students will engage with critical sources at a sophisticated level, in preparation for their senior honors project. Students must reeive a C or better in this course for it to count towards the major.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 242 - Introduction to Drama

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 101 and ENG 102 is required for eligibility. An introduction to analyzing and writing about literature, focusing on the genre of drama. Students will learn techniques for reading analytically and critically and for writing critical/research papers on dramatic and theatrical works. The course will examine the generic characteristics of a variety of types of drama, including works written in English by men and women from diverse ethnic/cultural groups and some translated works illustrating various national traditions. Alternate for ENG 102 with approval. Students must receive a C or better in this course for it to count towards the major.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 248 - Multicultural Literature of US

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: ENG 101 and ENG 102. An introduction to the literatures (in English or translation) of one or more minority groups, defined by race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and/or physical condition; such as Native-Americans, Hispanic Americans. Asian-Americans, women, persons who are LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered and Questioning), and/or persons with disabilities. Topics, texts, and approaches will vary depending on the expertise of the instructor. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Th.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.is course may be repeated for a total of 12 credit hours with change of topic.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
  
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    ENG 309 - Writing Center Practicum

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor based on evaluation of a writing sample. Composition and tutoring theory integrated with practical experience in the teaching of writing. May be repeated up to 4 times. Counts toward the secondary English certification requirement in advanced composition


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    ENG 310 - Traditional Grammar

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 101 and ENG 102. Survey of traditional grammar, its history and present use in the schools. Cross-listed with LIN 310. Linguistics course.


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    ENG 311 - Elements of Linguistics

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: ENG 101 and ENG 102; must have at least sophomore standing. Survey of phonology, morphology, syntax, historical linguistics, semantics, pragmatics, and psycholinguistics with reference to modern English. Cross-listed with LIN 311. Linguistics course.


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    ENG 313 - Studies In Linguistics

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: ENG 311 or LIN 311 or ANT 120 or LIN 120 or consent of the instructor. Core course in a mainstream linguistic topic, such as American English dialects, historical linguistics, morphology, history of the English language, modern English grammar, semantics, or sociolinguistics. May be taken uo to three times with a change in topic.


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    ENG 314 - Applied Linguistics

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor Course in the professional application of linguistics, such as Language Diversity and Teaching English, Lexicography, or English as a Second Language. May be taken up to three times with change of change in topic. Cross-listed with LIN 314.


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    ENG 315 - Introduction to the English Language

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: ENG 101 and ENG 102. An overview of the main components of a linguistic description of English and of the history of the language with an introduction to some relevant areas of applied linguistics: language acquisition; regional and social dialects; socio-linguistics; and pragmatics. Cross-listed with LIN 315.


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    ENG 320 - Classical Literature in Translation

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Survey of major literature of ancient Greece and Rome, including the Iliad, the Odyssey, Vergil's Aeneid, and other significant works by classical authors.


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    ENG 321 - British Literature I

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Survey of British literature from its Anglo-Saxon beginnings to 1789.


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    ENG 322 - British Literature II

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Survey of British literature from 1789 to the present. .


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    ENG 331 - Studies in Medieval Literature

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Topics include Arthurian tradition, Dante, Malory, women and writing, and other medieval themes and genres. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credit hours with a change in topic. Classical and Medieval Studies course.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 332 - Studies in Renaissance Literature

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. 16th-and 17th-century authors, genres, themes, or movements, including humanism, the Reformation, metaphysical and cavalier poetry, scientific empiricism, neo-classicism. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credit hours with a change in topic.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 333 - Studies in Restoration and 18-th Century British Literature

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Authors, genres, themes, or movements in 18th-century poetry and fiction. Possible topics include the Enlightenment, satire, rise of the novel, and neoclassical and pre-Romantic poetry. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credit hours with a change in topic.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 334 - Studies In 19th-Century British Literature

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Authors, genres, themes, or movements in 19th-century poetry, fiction, and drama. Possible topics include Romatic-era women writers, the literature of British imperialism, and the fiction of Jane Austen. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credit hours with a change in topic.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 335 - Studies in 20Th Century British Literature

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Modern and contemporary British and Anglophone authors, genres, themes or movements. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credit hours with a change in topic.


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    ENG 336 - Studies in Non-Western Literature

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequsites: ENG 101 and ENG 102. Reading and analysis of literary texts from non-Western cultures. Possible topics include: Non-Western Epic; Native American Literature; Contemporary Non-Western Fiction. English majors enrolled in the Multicultural/Multiethnic concentration may take the course up to three times with change of topic as multicultural electives.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 341 - American Literature I

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. American literature from the 17th century to the mid 19th century, intended to provide a sense of historical movements -Puritanism, federalism, classicism, romanticism, transcendentalism.


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    ENG 342 - American Literature II

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. American literature from the mid-nineteenth-century to modern times, intended to provide a sense of historical movements -romanticism, realism, naturalism, modernism, post-modernism.


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    ENG 346 - Studies in American Fiction

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Studies in the American short story and/or novel focusing on a specific author, theme, movement, period, or subgenre. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credit hours with a change in topic.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 347 - Studies in African-American Literature

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Authors, themes, or movements of significance in African-American literature. Topics include slave narratives, Harlem Renaissance, literature of the 1950s, African-American women authors. May be taken up to three times with a change in topic.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
  
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    ENG 352 - Studies in Poetry

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Authors, themes, or movements significant in British, American, European, or world poetry. May be taken up to three times with a change of topic.


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    ENG 355 - Major Genre/Stud in Genre

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Themes or genres significant in British, American, European, or world literature. Topics in the past have included European Romanticism, and multicultural literature and pedagogy. May be taken up to three times with a change in topic.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements."


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 360 - Studies in Literary Criticism

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Study of milestones in criticism by Aristotle, Sidney, Johnson, Wordsworth, and Arnold, and/or of modern and contemporary critical movements such as new criticism, structuralism, deconstruction, feminist criticism, and post-structuralism. May be taken up to three times with a change in topic.


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    ENG 363 - Gender Issues in Literature

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Studies in gender theory and gender issues in literature. Topics may include contemporary feminist themes, writings of women of a particular ethnicity such as Asian-American or Latina; the intersection of gender, race, and class; the relationship of gender to voice, technique and genre; archetypes and how questions of language are linked to these issues.May be taken up to three times with a change of topic.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 364 - Popular Culture

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: 200 level literature course or permission of instructor; must have at least sophomore standing. Critical methodology and study of genres in such areas as science fiction, the western, gothic romance, comparative studies in literature and film, or mass media aesthetics. May be taken up to three times with a change of topic.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
  
  
  
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    ENG 380 - Imagination Conference

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: ENG 101 and ENG 102; Permission of instructor based upon manuscript submission. Intensive five-day summer workshop with visiting writers (fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction); "craft" analyses of creative writing. Students complete a manuscript at the beginning of summer semester and present the manuscript in revised form at the end of the summer semester. In addition to tuition, students will be charged a Workshop and Materials Fee. Contact Imagination Conference website http://www.csuohio.edu/imagination.


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    ENG 390 - Literary Magazine

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Approval of faculty advisor to the literary magazine. Practicum in professional editing, writing and administration of a literary magazine. Graded S/U only; does not count toward the major. Current options are editorial work on the Whiskey Island magazine, or work in the preparation of reviews of poetry books for the Burning Press. May be repeated for up to four credits.


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    ENG 391 - Fiction Workshop

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: ENG 203 or ENG 303 or permission of instructor. Craft course in the writing of fiction. May be taken up to three times. May count toward the English major or creative writing concentration only twice.


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    ENG 392 - Creative Non-Fiction Workshop

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: ENG 203 or ENG 303 or permission of instructor. Craft course in the writing of creative non-fiction. May be taken up to three times. May count toward the English major or creative writing concentration only twice.


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    ENG 393 - Playwriting Workshop

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: ENG 203 or ENG 303 or permission of instructor. Craft course in the writing of playscripts. May be taken up to three times. May count toward the English major or creative writing concentration only twice.


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    ENG 394 - Poetry Workshop

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: ENG 203 or ENG 303 or permission of instructor. Craft course in the writing of poetry. May be taken up to three times. May count toward the English major or creative writing concentration only twice.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 396 - Independent Study

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Written permission of the instructor and prior approval by the Committee on Instruction in the English Department at least two weeks prior to the term in which the independent study would begin. Intensive study of a specialized topic growing out of 300-level English course work. Students may count up to four independent study credits toward the major. A student must be in good academic standing to qualify for an independent study. Independent studies cannot be given as substitutes for courses that normally are offered in the curriculum. Contact the English Department for further information.


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    ENG 490 - Professional Internship

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty anchor and field supervisor. Internships are available through Career Services. Professional writing interns must have completed all university writing requirements.


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    ENG 495 - Senior Seminar

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: English major with senior standing, or permission of instructor, is required for eligibility. Literature studied in the context of significant theoretical questions: an author, genre, or theme considered from a variety of critical perspectives. The seminar may be repeated with change of topic for a total of 6 credit hours.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    ENG 496H - Honors Research Project

    [3 credit(s)]
    Intensive independent research project on a specialized topic growing out of a 300-level English course work. The student and the professor must meet for the equivalent of at least one hour per week, and the student must produce a significant final written product: in literary analysis, a research paper of 20 to 25 pages; in creative writing, a minimum of 20 pages of poetry, a complete play, or 30 pages of fiction or creative non-fiction. This course is required of all honors English majors. This project cannot be given as a substitute for courses that normally are offered in the curriculum.


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Environmental Science

  
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    EVS 206 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    [3 credit(s)]
    Environmental science is highly interdisciplinary, integrating concepts and principles of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. A wide array of environmental issues such as air pollution, soil erosion, climate change, biodiversity loss, food security, sustainable agriculture, clean water, ecosystem sustainability, and energy extraction and consumption will be studied. The role of humans as conservationists and destroyers in nature will be examined and evaluated.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
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    EVS 300 - Physical Features of Ecosystems

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Declared EVS major or permission of the instructor, Corequisite: EVS 301. Overview of the dynamics of the abiotic factors contributing to ecosystem structure and function. The course will include water resources and flood hazards, environmental hazards, soils, and waste management. It will deal both with natural factors and environments that have been affected by human intervention, as well as conservation of the resources on which society depends.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    EVS 301 - Physical Features of Ecosystems Laboratory

    [1 credit(s)]
    Corequisite: EVS 300. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in EVS 300.


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    EVS 302 - Biological Features of Ecosystems

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: BIO 202, or permission of instructor, is a prerequisite; EVS 303 is a corequisite for this course. An introduction to biological features and resources of ecosystems, and their conservation and management.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    EVS 303 - Biological Features of Ecosystems Laboratory

    [1 credit(s)]
    Corequisite: EVS 302. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in EVS 302.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    EVS 322 - Geospatial Concepts & Tools

    [2 credit(s)]
    Corequisite: EVS 323. Principles of concepts and practice in physical and environmental geography, concentrating on the information and tools we use to visualize and analyze the environment. Basic information sources include maps, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery. Analytical tools include direct observation and measurement of these sources, as well as an introduction to the use of geographic information systems and image processing for remote sensing. Intended for majors in biology, and environmental science.


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    EVS 323 - Geospatial Concepts & Tools: Practicum

    [2 credit(s)]
    Corequisite: EVS 322. Practicum on concepts and practice in physical and environmental geography, concentrating on the information and tools presented in EVS 322. Hands-on work will deal with maps, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery and will involve open-laboratory work followed by a 1-hour recitation. Intended for majors in biology and environmental science.


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    EVS 354 - Environmental Geochemistry

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: GEO 100 and CHM 251 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EVS 355. This course deals with concepts and principles of low-temperature geochemistry and their applications to studies of earth and environmental science processes. Topics include element abundance, geochemical equilibrium, water chemistry, sedimentary geochemistry, stable isotope geochemistry, and radiometric dating or geochronology.


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    EVS 355 - Environmental Geochemistry Lab

    [1 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: GEO 100 and CHM 251 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EVS 354. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in EVS 354


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    EVS 380 - Earth System Science for Middle School Teachers

    [3 credit(s)]
    Enrollment is restricted to students seeking middle school licensure. Concepts of earth system science relevant to students seeking middle school licensure will be discussed and related to timely issues. No credit towards geology or environmental science major or minor. Prerequisite(s): GEO 100, GEO 101 or permission of the instructor. Co-requisite EVS 381


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    EVS 381 - Earth Science Middle School Teachers Lab

    [1 credit(s)]
    Enrollment is restricted to students seeking middle school licensure. Laboratory exercises and inquiry-based activities will coordinate with lectures. No credit towards biology major or minor. Co-requisite EVS 380.


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    EVS 390 - Writing in Environmental Science I

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: a declared environmental science major plus EVS 300 or EVS 302. This course is designed to develop the writing and oral presentation skills of students through assigned projects and in-class activities. Students write a conceptual (review or theoretical) paper according to a standard format and learn other methods of presenting scientific results.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    EVS 422 - GIS Applications to Field Sciences

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: EVS 323 or permission of instructor. Corequisite EVS 423. Principles of concepts and practice utilizing the application of ArcGIS to field sciences, such as archeology, biology, environmental science, and geology


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    EVS 423 - GIS Application/Field Sciences: Practicum

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: GEO or EVS 323 or permission of instructor. Required corequisite: EVS 422 Practicum on the applications of ArcGIS to field sciences, based on the information and tools presented in GEO 422.


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    EVS 424 - Introduction to Remote Sensing

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): GEO 323 or permission of instructor. Required corequisite: EVS 425. Introduction to Remote Sensing, concentrating on the information and tools we use to interpret remotely sensed imagery to understand its application to the field sciences.


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    EVS 425 - Introduction to Remote Sensing: Practicum

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): EVS or GEO 323 or permission of instructor. Required corequisite: EVS 424. Practicum on concepts and practice in the application of remotely sensed imagery to field sciences, as introduced in EVS 424. It will concentrate on the use of satellite imagery and aerial photography, as well as standardized data sets available from commercial sources and the WorldWide Web. Laboratory is selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in lecture.


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    EVS 426 - Advanced GIS & Remote Sensing

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): EVS 422 or EVS 424 or equivalent. Recommended EVS 422 and EVS 424. Required corequisite: EVS 427. Orientation to topics dealing with techniques and problems associated with using remote-sensed data and GIS for analyses in field sciences such as archeology, biology, environmental science, geology, etc. These topics will go beyond those presented in prerequisite courses and will present cutting-edge aspects of geospatial science.


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    EVS 427 - Advanced GIS & Remote Sensing: Practicum

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): GEO 422 or GEO 424 or equivalent. Recommended GEO 422 and GEO 424. Required corequisite: EVS 426. Laboratory exercises dealing with the topics presented in EVS 426.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
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    EVS 444 - Hydrology

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): At least one course at the 300-level or higher in Geology, Engineering, or Environmental Sciences. Corequisite: GEO/EVS 445. The fundamental principles of surface water, vadose zone, watershed, groundwater, chemical and isotope hydrology will be studied. Theories and methods will be examined and applied to investigations of hydrologic processes, including identification and quantification of evaporation, precipitation, infiltration, transpiration, surface and subsurface flows. Laboratory exercises will cover mathematical and computer solutions to equations and real life situations. Some field work will be required.


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    EVS 450 - Applied Ecology

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: BIO 300 or BIO 302 or BIO 304 or permission of instructor. Our lives have been increasingly touched by questions pertaining to environmental degradation at local, regional, and global scales. Students will examine ways in which ecological principles can be applied to solving some of these crucial environmental problems. Topics include global climate change, sustainability, agroforestry, biodiversity and conservation, invasive species, ecotoxicology, biomonitoring and bioremediation, and restoration ecology.


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    EVS 454 - Conservation Biology

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: BIO 304. This course will examine the causes and scientific responses to the current worldwide crisis of declining biodiversity. Scientific principles underlying conservation biology are emphasized, but students also will explore the role that culture, societal values, politics, and economics play in conservation issues.


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    EVS 455 - Conservation Biology Laboratory

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: BIO 304. Examination of central principles of conservation biology through field studies and computerized analyses of data for actual endangered and threatened species. This laboratory course provides students with experience in quantification and analysis of biodiversity, environmental monitoring, mathematical modeling, risk assessment, and other methods used in conservation biology, ecology, and natural resource management.


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    EVS 460 - Geomorphology

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: GEO/EVS 322 or permission of instructor. Required Corequisite: EVS 461. Study of the surface forms of the earth, with emphasis on erosional or depositional processes in different climates and the forms they produce.


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    EVS 470 - Aquatic Ecosystems

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 202, and CHM 261 or equivalent. Corequisite: EVS 471. A study of aquatic ecosystems, including lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands. Commonalities and differences between the physical-chemical and biological components of these ecosystems will be discussed. The impacts of human activities on these ecosystems are covered, as well as water quality assessment techniques, pollution control, and regulation. This course includes three required Saturday field trips.


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    EVS 471 - Aquatic Ecosystems Laboratory

    [1 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: BIO 200, BIO 202 and CHM 261. Co-requisite: EVS 470. Selected exercises to introduce students to hands-on sampling and analytical techniques used in water quality assessment. This course includes three required Saturday field trips, each equivalent to two classroom laboratory periods.


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    EVS 472 - Introduction to Watersheds of Northeast Ohio

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: GEO 323 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EVS 473. Introduction to the study of watersheds.


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    EVS 473 - Introduction to Watersheds of Northeast Ohio Laboratory

    [2 credit(s)]
    Corequisite: EVS 472. Students will examine chemical, biological, and habitat aspects of area streams; study the watersheds of those streams; and carry out limited watershed-modeling exercises designed to help understand the dynamics of watersheds and the streams that drain them.


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    EVS 490 - Internship in Environmental Science

    [4 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Independent study related to work experience for majors in Environmental Sciences. May be repeated for credit for a total of 8 credit hours.


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    EVS 491 - Honors Research

    [1-2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Admission to EVS Honors Program. Supervised research in a faculty member's laboratory on a project approved by the Honors Program Committee. May be repeated for credit.


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    EVS 492 - Honors Thesis and Defense

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Admission to EVS Honors Program. Written reprot on honors research project and a public defense of the thesis before a faculty committee.


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    EVS 494 - Special Topics in Environmental Science

    [1-6 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: At least junior standing. Study of a particular topic in environmental science. Topics to be announced in semester course schedule. May be repeated for credit for a total of 12 credit hours with a change of topic.


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    EVS 496 - Independent Study in Environmental Science

    [1-6 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and BGES undergraduate environmental science advisor. Independent study of material of special or timely interest which is not likely to be appropriate for, or covered in, regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit for a total of 12 credit hours with a change in topic.


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    EVS 497 - Research in Environmental Science

    [1-6 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and BGES undergraduate environmental science advisor. Undergraduate research carried out by special arrangement. The student may work independently or as an assistant to a faculty investigator. May be repeated for credit for a total of 12 credit hours.


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    EVS 499 - Exit Evaluation

    [0 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Senior standing. Final exit examination and outcomes assessment evaluation required of all graduating seniors. Graded S/U.


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Finance

  
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    FIN 201 - Personal Financial Planning

    [3 credit(s)]
    Introduction to concepts in finance (risk, return, liquidity, horizon, inflation, and taxation) applied to personal financial planning; impact of career choice on discretionary income; basic financial planning; investing at low risk vs. aggressive investing; investing in real assets, commodities, and related topics. NOTE: BBA students may take this course only as a free elective.


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    FIN 350 - Finacial Decision Making with Bloomberg

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: ACT 222, ECN 201 and ECN 202. This course will cover the application of financial software and institutional financial data systems. There are two key parts to the course: (1) learning how to use the software; (2) learning about trading in the markets. Knowledge of Bloomberg provides a background in data extraction and analysis for the industry leading data systems. Financial software also includes applications in Excel, modeling software, simulation programs, options analysis, trading models, and other financial software analysis programs. The FTS (Financial Trading System) and the Think or Swim trading platform software provides numerous different opportunities to learn about how markets work by participating in simulation trading and case studies.


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    FIN 351 - Introduction To Financial Management

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: ACT 222, ECN 201, ECN 202. A study of the basic tools and concepts of financial management and their application to the areas of financial statement analysis, leverage, short-term and long-term financing, financial forecasting, time value of money, working capital management, investment banking, cost of capital, capital budgeting, capital structure, valuation, dividend policy, mergers and acquisitions, and multinational finance.


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    FIN 353 - Introduction to Investments

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: FIN 351. An introduction to the factors affecting changes in prices of securities and their relation to objectives of personal and institutional investors. The course introduces functions, operations, and workings of various securities markets, stock, bond, option and futures. It covers factors affecting the security prices, risk, and fundamental valuation principles of security prices. Its primary focus is on the understanding of the mechanics and terminology of various security markets, and the risk and fundamental valuation principles of security prices.


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    FIN 360 - Financial Markets & Institutions

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: FIN 351. An analysis of the financial instruments (including derivative securities) of both domestic and international institutions of the money and capital markets; plus the operations of financial intermediaries such as commercial banks, savings and loan associations, and insurance and investment companies.


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    FIN 362 - Introduction to Corporate Finance

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 351. This course investigates how companies make investment and financing decisions from the perspective of the corporate manager. It provides a framework for understanding how a corporation's financing, investment, and dividend policies affect its value. It also provides the tools necessary for analyzing and making these decisions. Specific topics include capital budgeting, valuation, cost of capital determination, capital-structure decisions, dividend policy, short-term finance, mergers and acquisitions, and leasing.


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    FIN 454 - Advanced Investments

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: FIN 353. A more detailed consideration of factors studied in FIN 353, with particular emphasis on comprehensive industry analysis and common stocks, bonds, and options; portfolio theory and the portfolio management process. Course focuses upon detailed qualitative and fundamental valuation models for various financial securities; stocks, bonds, options and futures; and risk-return analysis. Emphasis is on institutional investors such as mutual funds and pension funds, and will include coverage of international investing.


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    FIN 461 - Bank Management

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: FIN 351; must have at least junior standing and be a declared major in the College of Business to be eligible for this course. A study of management of bank funds and the organization and structure of the commercial banking industry. Topics include the management of liquidity, investments, loans, liabilities, and capital; the impact of bank regulatory agencies and the changes in money and capital market conditions on the management of bank funds; evaluation of the performance of bank holding companies; and international banking.


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    FIN 465 - International Finance/Investmt

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: FIN 351. A survey of international trade, foreign exchange markets, balance of payments, exchange rate determination, and official reserves; international corporate finance, capital budgeting, cash management, capital structure, cost of capital, transfer pricing, and tax management; accounting translation, hedging and international banking.


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    FIN 470 - Introduction to Risk & Insurance

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: FIN 351. An examination of risk, methods of handling risk, the insurance mechanism, characteristics of insurance, legal concepts underlying insurance contracts, risk management, captives, types of insurers, and insurance company operations. A variety of insurance products are covered, including homeowners' insurance, automobile insurance, umbrella coverage, title insurance, workers' compensation, life insurance, annuities, and health insurance. The emphasis of the course is on property and liability insurance.


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