Jul 19, 2024  
Undergraduate Catalog 2014 - 2015 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2014 - 2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Religious Studies

  
  • REL 235H - Origins Christian Religion

    [3 credit(s)]


    Students may not receive credit for both REL 235H and REL 236. An introduction to the critical study of Christian origins and the New Testament as seen from the perspective of comparative religion. After a brief introduction to religion in the ancient Mediterranean world, the course investigates the evolution of early Christian religion from Jesus to his earliest followers in this context, with special attention to issues of myth, ritual, spirit possession, ethics, social identity, and institutional authority. Underlying themes include the relation of the first Christians to other groups of the ancient Mediterranean world, and the question of unity and diversity in the New Testament. Emphasis on close, critical analysis of primary texts.


    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
  • REL 248 - Race, Immigration and Religion in America

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course explores the complex relationship between three key themes in American history: immigration, race and religion. The course focuses specifically on the impact of four immigrant groups (Europeans, Africans, Latinos, and South Asians) on the religious landscape of America. The course spans the period from First European contact with Native Americans until the present. In this course, we examine how immigration has resulted in religious and cultural exchange, adjustment, retrenchment, and/or assimilation among the various cultures that have occupied the physical space of the U.S. over the course of the last six centuries. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of materials in this course, including primary documents, secondary documents, film and television, music, and material culture.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  • REL 341 - Judaism in the Greek and Roman Worlds

    [3 credit(s)]
    A critical examination of the history, literature, and religion of the Jewish people in the Post-Exilic Era, with special emphasis on the Greco-Roman period. Themes include the interplay of political history and religious innovation, and Jewish strategies for maintaining a distinct cultural and religious identity in conversation with a dominant Hellenistic culture.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • REL 342 - The Rise of Modern Judaism

    [3 credit(s)]
    Cultural, social, and religious history of the Jews in the Middle Ages and modern times, with particular emphasis on Judaism in America in the 20th century.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • REL 343 - Medieval Christianity

    [3 credit(s)]
    A historical examination of Medieval Christian thought as exemplified in major writings from the end of the Roman Empire in the West to the dawn of the Renaissance.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  • REL 345 - The Protestant Reformation

    [3 credit(s)]
    Historical Study of the growth and development of Christian thought in the sixteenth-century Reformation. Focus on major writings that exemplify critical themes and issues.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • REL 346 - Christian Mysticism

    [3 credit(s)]
    An exploration of the tradition of mystical thought and practice in Western religious culture. The course begins from the beliefs of the ancient world about the human person and divinity that are the primary enablers of mystical thinking and goes on to examine the development of the mystical tradition of the Christian West in its social, literary, religious, aesthetic, and personal dimensions.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • REL 350 - Religion in Interdisciplinary Perspective

    [3 credit(s)]
    An analysis of influential studies of religion from a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, history, literary studies, psychology, and others.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • REL 360 - Hinduism

    [3 credit(s)]
    Origin and historical development of Hinduism, including its systems of thought, religious literature, institutions, and practices.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • REL 362 - Buddhism

    [3 credit(s)]
    Origin and historical development of Buddhism, including its systems of thought, religious literature, institutions, and practices.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
  • REL 366 - Modern Islamic Movements

    [3 credit(s)]
    This class explores the impact of political Islam on today’s world. Students will study the development and beliefs of influential Islamic movements during the modern era, as well as the relationship between religion and politics within several contemporary Islamic societies. Readings include the works of modern Muslim writers from a variety of backgrounds and perspectives. The class will consider the arguments of radical Islamists such as Sayyid Qutb or the Ayatollah Khomeini, as well as Muslim thinkers who represent a different, more liberal interpretation of Islam. Topics include: Islam and Democracy, Role of Women, Freedom of Thought, Holy War, and Islamic views on religious and political authority. The course will also discuss the controversial topic of whether Islam and the West are engaged in a violent clash of civilizations.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • REL 367 - Muslim Relations with Christians and Jews

    [3 credit(s)]
    In this course, we will study the history of conflict and cooperation between Christians, Muslims and Jews, read foundational, historical, and modern texts exemplifying views from each faith community towards the others, examine modern conflicts, and learn about recent approaches at inter-faith dialogue and cooperation. Background knowledge of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam is helpful, and introductory information on all three faiths will be available on two hour reserve at the library for those who are interested.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • REL 368 - Religion in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

    [3 credit(s)]
    In this class we will study the role that religion has played and continues to play in the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, both positive impacts and difficulties it has created. We will become familiar with different varieties of Jews, Christians and Muslims and the involvement that each has had in the conflict. Course requirements include a 10-12 page original research paper, ten reading responses, participation in five case study debates, a map assignment and a final examination.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • REL 369 - Everyday Life in Muslim Societies

    [3 credit(s)]
    In this class we will address common stereotypes of Muslims and Islam by examining the varieties of Islamic practice followed by average Muslims in large Islamic communities located on three different continents. Students will learn about everyday beliefs and practices in such areas as Islamic ritual, social relationships, gender roles, Muslim sects, mystical beliefs, the role of politics, and the impact of Islamic law on Muslim societies. Our focus will be upon common Islamic beliefs and practices rather than upon extremist groups and radical beliefs.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • REL 374 - Letters and the Religion of the Apostle Paul

    [3 credit(s)]
    Critical investigation of the seven “undoubted” letters of Paul in history of religons perspective. Special attention will be given to Paul’s efforts to create and maintain new religious communities with a distinct social and cultural identity in the ancient Mediterranean world; to the beliefs, practices, and authority structures that defined those communities; and to the controversies Paul’s efforts generated within the early Jesus movement.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  • REL 466 - Advanced Topics in the Historical Jesus

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: REL 232. Selected topics in the study of Jesus and the origin of the early Christian movement. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  
  • REL 495 - Seminar in Religion

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite(s): Two courses in religion or permission of instructor. Intensive examination of the works of specific religious thinkers and movements. Specific topics listed in the semester course schedule. May be repeated with a change of topic for up to 6 credit hours.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • REL 496 - Research in Religion

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Course is closed to Freshmen and Non Degree Seeking Students. Guided independent research, term paper and/or examination required as appropriate. Application for permission to register must be submitted to the chairperson during the semester prior to the enrollment in the course. May be repeated for up to 12 credit hours.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  

Science

  
  • SCI 220 - Science as a Way of Thinking

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Completion of General Education requirements in the areas of English Composition and Mathematics/Quantitative Literacy. An introduction to scientific reasoning, the nature of scientific evidence, and the foundation of major scientific theories. Examples from the major scientific disciplines will be used to illustrate how scientists create, use, and update their views of the world.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SCI 220H - H-Science as A Way of Thinking

    [3 credit(s)]
    An introduction to scientific reasoning, the nature of scientific disciplines will be used to illustrate how scientists create, use, and update their of the world. br>
    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SCI 298 - Science Internship

    [4 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Written permission of supervising CSU faculty member. Guided hands-on experience of clinical or research activities in a community setting. This course is an individually designed course in which each student will write a contract with a community agency or institution. The supervising CSU faculty member will review and approve the contract, and identify the appropriate number of credit hours based on the proposed activities. Grading will be on a “satisfactory/unsatisfactory” scale.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SCI 301 - Graduate Record Examination General Test Preparation Course

    [1 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. This course prepares students for Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) General Test. The course is composed of verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning and analytical writing sections.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SCI 410 - Urban Health Seminar I

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the NEOMED-CSU joint Postbaccalaureate/MD or Baccalaureate/MD programs focused on Urban Primary Care. This seminar course will cover a range of topics relevant to urban health and urban primary healthcare.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SCI 411 - Urban Health Seminar II

    [2 credit(s)]
    Acceptance into the NEOMED-CSU joint Postbaccalaureate/MD or Baccalaureate/MD programs focused on Urban Primary Care and satisfactory completion of SCI 410, Urban Health Seminar I. This seminar course will cover a range of topics relevant to urban health and urban primary healthcare. Topics will include Urban Health, Primary Care, and Urban Primary Care.


    Click here for the schedule of courses


Slovenian

  
  • SLN 101 - Beginning Slovenian I

    [4 credit(s)]
    Development of proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Slovenian with contextual information.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SLN 102 - Beginning Slovenian II

    [4 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: SLN 101 or the equivalent course with C or better. Development of proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Slovenian with contextual cultural information.


    Click here for the schedule of courses


Social Work

  
  • SWK 150 - The Black Experience and Contemporary Society

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course is a comprehensive overview of the contemporary Black experience as viewed from the social work perspective. This perspective assumes that being Black exposes one to differential treatment by social institutions. It also strives to introduce students to effective strategies for use at the individual, family, group, and community levels which seek to offset racism’s negative consequences.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 200 - Introduction to Social Work

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite to the major. Introduces students to concepts, settings, and vulnerable populations related to the field of social work. Emphasis placed on purposes, values, ethics, knowledge, and skills that characterize the professional social worker. Provides an overview of theoretical and practical knowledge about the social work profession needed for entry levels of practice in social work.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 201 - Contemporary Social Welfare

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite to SWK 300. Surveys the U.S. social welfare system, its purposes, historical development, and present functioning. Examines social welfare in a local, national, and international context, and in relation to broader political, social, and economic system. Addresses how social welfare responds to poverty, racism, sexism, and other institutionalized forms of oppression and injustice. Reviews alternative programs and policies that better meet human needs.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 240 - Administration of Justice

    [3 credit(s)]
    Study of criminal justice system. Topics include criminal prosecution, police and court functions, sentencing, and corrections, with critical examination of present practices and implications for change.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 300 - Social Welfare Policy

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: SWK 201. Examines the policy-making process in social welfare, from policy formulation and development to implementation and impact. Reviews major social welfare policy developments in U.S. history, such as income security, health care and civil rights. Emphasizes conceptual and analytic models for policy development and evaluation in relation to social work’s commitment to serving populations at risk and promoting global social and economic justice. Students must participate and process a local governmental meeting.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 302 - Human Behavior and Social Environments - Micro

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Comparative analysis of selected theories of human behavior in the social environment through the life cycle for the purpose of understanding criteria for selection, use, and integration of theory and social intervention.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 303 - Human Behavior and Social Environments - Macro

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Comparative study of human behavior within the contexts of formal and informal social systems (families, small groups, neighborhoods, organizations) focusing on the relationship between social environment and human behavior. Students compare and contrast theories that impact the functioning of individuals in various categorical groups. Such as analyzing the culture of poverty, the impact of social economic status and the changing community patterns.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 304 - Perspectives on Social Work Research I

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: SWK 201. Introduction to the philosophy and methodology of science; acquaints the student with research techniques, strategies, and resources; develops critical readership ability; promotes consumership of research findings in social-work practice; instructs in the ethical and political considerations which are inherent in research. This course also provides students with skills to develop field research proposals.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 305 - Perspectives on Social Work Research II

    [3 credit(s)]
    This class aims to expand students’ understanding of quantitative and qualitative methodologies, techniques and skills for data collection and management. It also aims to provide students with computer skills for text and data processing, and data processing techniques for descriptive and inferential statistics from research data. This course will expand students’ knowledge and skills for social-work practice-related research and evaluation.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 350 - Basic Generalist Practice

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course is the first of the Intervention sequence, which prepares social work majors for generalist social work practice. It is designed to develop and enhance the students’ knowledge, skills and affective development in forming working relationships necessary for generalist social work practice with individuals, families, small groups, organizations, and communities within a diverse society. Students participate in twelve hours of service learning project within a Health and Human Service Agency. Three presentations are made by each student. Students are required to achieve a grade of “B” or better to pass this course.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 353 - Child Welfare Service

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. The history of child welfare, family problems as they affect child welfare, and issues and alternatives in child-care services; discussion of settings where services are provided, as well as perspectives concerning child welfare as an area of practice.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 354 - Mental Health

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Introduces students to conceptual alternatives in mental health and acquaints them with consequences of these various conceptual approaches, encourages a scientific perspective in the mental-health field, educates students to seek new approaches to practice in the mental health field.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 357 - Social Work Values and Ethics

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course focuses on the foundations for ethical reasoning in practice, utilizing social work values, codes of ethics, and philosophic ethics. Case material that includes controversial issues in social work ethics, values and obligations are utilized. The distinction and relationship between practice competence and ethical competence in the profession is examined. Students learn how discipline-specific perspectives and practices interact to shape the ethical and moral issues in practice, and how to identify and respond to ethical issues that arise with diverse populations in a variety of practice settings, including health, mental health, corrections, family and child welfare.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 372 - Substance Abuse in Society

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Course provides a historical perspective regarding the use of mind-altering substances and views the impact(s) of use/abuse on the individual, family, and society. In addition, the course will examine various treatment modalities and the impact on vulnerable groups (such as adolescents, delinquents, elderly, minorities).


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 385 - Interventions I

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 201, SWK 300, SWK 302, SWK 303, SWK 304, SWK 305, SWK 350; written permission of advisor. Fundamental and basic professional course that allows students to develop, expand, and utilize knowledge of human development and social structure to initiate a framework for social-work practice; uses generalist model which requires development of skills that can be used in various social contexts. First of a two-semester sequence which encompasses a full range of strategies and skills necessary when working with individuals, families, small groups, organizations and communities. Emphasis on an inquiry model of social-work practice. A lab experience is required of all students as part of the course. Open to social-work majors only. Student must achieve a grade of B or better to continue into SWK 485, SWK 490, and SWK 495. SWK 385, SWK 390 and SWK 395 must be taken concurrently.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 386 - Integrative Seminar I (Capstone I)

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 201, SWK 300, SWK 302, SWK 303, SWK 304, SWK 305, SWK 350 as well as all general education requirements. This is the capstone project for Social Work majors and is completed over two semesters. The integrative seminar provides an opportunity for students to enhance their knowledge, skills, and values in their professional development. The seminar is student driven with an individualized approach to learning.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 390 - Field Practicum I

    [6 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Written permission of field coordinator. SWK 385, SWK 390, and SWK 395 must be taken concurrently. Placement in a selected community-service agency for 16 hours provides an opportunity to gain experience in the application of concepts and principles of interventions through actual problem-solving in the human service context. The student is required to demonstrate the integration of skills and a professional attitude in their work with clients and the agency. Continuation onto a second field practicum (SWK 490) and completion of the major are contingent on a grade of “B” or better.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 395 - Field Seminar I

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Written permission of field coordinator. This course is taken concurrently with SWK 385 and SWK 490. Students are expected to synthesize practicum learning with knowledge gained in field experience and other courses. Themes addressed are practicum agency, policies, programs, current issues, various practice strategies and approaches. Student must achieve a grade of B or better to continue into SWK 485, SWK 490, and SWK 495. A log will be required of each student.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 396 - Readings in Social Work

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Written permission of instructor and Director. Readings and assignments in areas of special interest to the Social Work major. May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 470 - Problems and Issues in Criminal Justice

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: SWK 240. Examination of contemporary social issues, including alcoholism, drug addiction, mental illness, poverty, family crisis, nonvictim crime, child abuse, senility, and racism as they intersect the criminal-justice system. Interaction of social issues and criminal behavior is analyzed with the focus on alternatives to arrest and incarceration through the use of community resources. Course expectations assume a background in criminal justice or administration of justice system.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 485 - Interventions II

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: SWK 385, SWK 390, SWK 395 and written permission of field coordinator. SWK 485, SWK 490 and SWK 495 must be taken concurrently. Course is designed to give the student an opportunity to study the theory and develop skills related to small groups and community dynamics. Organizational dynamics and community services will be the primary focus for course. Advocacy and various strategies to promote social/organizational change will be considered. Completion of the major is contingent upon a grade of B or better.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 486 - Integrative Seminar II

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: SWK 386 as well as all general education courses and Social Work prerequisites. This course is primarily focused on enabling the students to transition into a professional Social Work position and/or pursue higher education. The course is designed and developed with a focus on insuring that students pass the licensure examination. The seminar provides opportunities for the students to develop integrity that will enhance their abilities and capacities to integrate personal values, society values, and professional values as a Generalist Social Work Practitioner.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 490 - Field Practicum II

    [6 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: SWK 385, SWK 390, SWK 395 and written permission of field coordinator. SWK 490 and SWK 495 must be taken concurrently. Continuation of SWK 390 involving an additional 16 hours per week minimum in community-service agency. Students may not receive field practicum experience for concurrent job experience, however, under exceptional circumstances, the department may agree to a field experience plan that incorporates part of a student’s experience into the field practicum. Completion of the major is contingent upon a grade of B or better.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 492 - Group Work Practice

    [3 credit(s)]
    Examines the fundamental knowledge and skills required for social work practice with groups across multiple client systems. Knowledge of social work values and ethics is applied as it related to all aspects of group work. Dynamics of working with special populations will be emphasized (e.g. the effects of the addictive processes on group therapy, age-appropriate communication with children.)


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 493 - Special Topics in Social Work

    [9 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Study of special topics not regularly appearing in curriculum, including new developments in practice, programs, policy, and fields of service; intensive study of specific problem areas. Course may be repeated for credit not more than three times.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 494 - Theories and Procedures in Addiction Studies

    [3 credit(s)]
    Explores historical perspective of substance abuse in society; models and theories that describes addiction and the effects of addiction on individuals and families; effects of addiction in individuals; techniques and practices that have positive outcomes in treatment and prevention fields; and professional issues facing the addiction field.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 495 - Field Seminar II

    [2 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Written permission of field coordinator. This is a continuation of SWK 395 and is taken concurrently with SWK 485 and SWK 490. Specific macro practices are addressed and students are expected to be more advanced in their ability to participate in dialogue. Completion of the major is contingent upon a grade of B or better. The log continues to be required.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 496 - Independent Study in Social Work

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Written permission of instructor and Director. Individual research or project conducted by Social Work majors. May be repeated for up to 9 credit hours.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SWK 497 - Independent Study in Criminal Justice

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisites: Written permission of instructor and chairperson. Individual research and projects conducted in the domain of criminal justice. May be repeated for up to 9 credit hours.


    Click here for the schedule of courses


Sociology

  
  
  • SOC 201 - Race, Class and Gender

    [3 credit(s)]
    Survey of major theoretical approaches to race, class and gender; examination of empirical evidence regarding the extent of these kinds of inequality, the ways in which they are produced and reproduced and their consequences. Attempts to overcome the harmful consequences of race, class, and gender inequality, both through the affirmation of identity and difference and through efforts to reduce and/or eliminate these forms of stratification will be reviewed.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SOC 201H - H: Race/Class/Gender Honors

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course introduces students to major sociological approaches to the study of race, class and gender in contemporary American society. Students will survey the major theoretical approaches to race, class and gender and will examine empirical evidence regarding the extent of these kinds of inequality, the ways in which they are produced and reproduced, and their consequences. Consideration will also be given to the complex interaction among race, class, and gender in American society.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SOC 203 - Sociology of Poverty

    [3 credit(s)]
    Analysis of the evolution and significance of poverty in the United States, the characteristics of the poor and the experience of poverty, competing explanations for poverty, and evaluation of the impact of social policy on the poor and society as a whole.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SOC 210 - Introduction to Sociology of the Third World

    [3 credit(s)]
    Explore the diversity of the Third World by examining the experiences of several specific countries and regions. Will consider the characteristics, problems, and dynamics they have in common. Special attention will be given to the origins of social conflict in the Third World and to the prospects for social change.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SOC 250 - Introduction to Criminology

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course provides overview of the field of criminology, including an examination of the causes, types, and distribution of crime in American society. Students are also introduced to the major components of the criminal justice system. Explores the collection and interpretation of crime data and contemporary issues relating to crime.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  • SOC 280H - H:Science/Technology/Society

    [3 credit(s)]
    This course uses concepts and methods from the social sciences to explore the relationship between science and technology and society. How do culture and social structure affect the production of scientific and technical knowledge? How do scientific and technological developments affect society?. This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SOC 305 - Urban Sociology

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must have at least sophomore standing to be eligible for this course. The study of metropolitan development and social life. Examines the role of economic, political, and cultural factors at the global, national, and regional levels. Explores the history of urban sociology and contemporary perspectives. Analyzes the process of social change at the metropolitan level.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  
  • SOC 312 - Sociology of Mental Illness

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must have at least sophomore standing to be eligible for this course. This course examines three central issues: our changing understanding of mental illness, the variety of approaches for the treatment of mental illness and the impact of social policy on the lives of the mentally ill. By combining historical, medical, and sociological perspectives, this course provides a broad introduction to the study of mental illness. The material is drawn primarily from the United States.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SOC 314 - Sociology of Sports

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must have at least sophomore standing to be eligible for this course. This course focuses on sports as social and cultural phenomena. Students will learn to use sociological concepts and critical thinking to discover how sports affect multiple spheres of our social life. The main focus will be on sports in the United States. Sports in other societies will be explored to help us better understand our sports through comparison and contrast. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own experiences as participants and spectators, and to connect these with larger social issues.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SOC 316 - Sociology of Aging

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must have at least sophomore standing to be eligible for this course. Critical analysis of the social status and participation of older persons in modern societies. Included topics such as theories of aging, demography, family ties, economic status, health-care delivery systems and long-term care, dying and death, and the U.S. as an aging society.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SOC 317 - Sociology of Gender

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must have at least sophomore standing to be eligible for this course. Examines the significance of gender differences in the experiences of women and men in social institutions (such as family, education, economic, legal, political), the theoretical perspectives utilized to analyze these differences, and the effects of changing expectations on gender roles and identities.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SOC 319 - Sociology of Religion

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must have at least sophomore standing to be eligible for this course. The course will present and compare/contrast major sociological theories of religion, examine historical and contemporary patterns of religious belief and participation, and the relationships between religion and other institutions including politics. The empirical focus will include both the contemporary United States and a comparative look at other societies.


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SOC 320 - Globalization

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must have at least sophomore standing to be eligible for this course. A comprehensive analysis of globalization including social, cultural, demographic, economic, and environmental issues. Key sociological concepts and theories informing this analysis include the meaning of globalization, the balance between flows and barriers, the roles of transnational corporations and political organizations, cultural differentialism, cultural hybridization, the impact of colonialism, and global inequality,


    Click here for the schedule of courses

  
  • SOC 335 - Drugs, Alcohol, and Crime

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must have at least sophomore standing to be eligible for this course. Course examines issues in licit and illicit drug use and alcohol misuse, their relationships to crime, and criminal justice system responses. Includes an overview of the history of drug use and related laws in the U.S., methods of studying alcohol and drugs, theories of drug use, and models in prevention and treatment.


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  • SOC 341 - Juvenile Delinquency

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must have at least sophomore standing to be eligible for this course. Examination of criminal and other forms of youthful misconduct in the context of the place of children and adolescents in American society. Particular emphasis placed upon the causes of various forms of delinquency and community-based prevention and corrective programs.


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  • SOC 344 - Criminal Justice Systems

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: SOC 250. Course provides an overview of the development and function of the criminal justice system in the United States. Examines theories of justice and punishment; emergence and development of contemporary police and court systems; structure and functioning of corrections; corrections as a form of social control; and the roles or criminal justice personnel, including police, parole, and correctional officers.


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  • SOC 345 - Social Control

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must have at least sophomore standing to be eligible for this course. Course investigates the meaning of social control, both as a formal and an informal system of constraint. Offers a historical account of the emergence and development of the prison in both Europe and the United States. Considers competing historical accounts of the birth of the prison in addition to exploring contemporary issues concerning surveillance and the use of technology to exercise control over a modern, predominantly urban population.

    This course may fulfill a General Education Requirement.  Click here for more information about General Education Requirements.


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  • SOC 347 - Sociology of Policing

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must have at least sophomore standing to be eligible for this course. Examines the roles of police in American society. Includes theories on the function of law enforcements; the history and development of modern police agencies; the structure and functioning of contemporary issues in policing including police discretion, use of force, and diversity. Course mephasizes a sociological understanding of police agencies as social institutions.


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  • SOC 348 - Sociology of Corrections

    [3 credit(s)]
    Prerequisite: Must have at least sophomore standing to be eligible for this course. Examines the nature of punishment of criminal offenders in the United States. Major topics include competing perspectives on the goals of punishment; the social world of the prison, including prison subculture and prison violence; the organization of corrections and correctional administration; and the efficacy of imprisonment as a means of reducing crime, including an examination of the death penalty.


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