Aug 12, 2020  
Undergraduate Catalog 2019 - 2020 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2019 - 2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]


Philosophy, B.A.



Description

Philosophy is the foundation for all other disciplines. As the questions are narrowed and the research tools become more refined, they break off into the more specialized disciplines we are familiar with today. In this way, philosophy aims at clarity of thought, constructing methods of justification, and the ability to communicate ideas

What careers can this major prepare you for?

Studies show that philosophy majors score significantly higher on the LSAT, GMAT, and GRE. Also philosophy majors have one of the highest acceptance rates for medical school compared to other undergraduate majors. Students go on to Masters and PhD programs in Philosophy, but many philosophy majors choose careers in other areas such as: Pre-college teaching, Health and medicine, Law and criminal justice, Public relations, Government (e.g. FBI), Non-profit Organizations, Global Development, Managerial work in business and public sector, Consulting, Publishing, Editing, Research, Library and Information Services.

What skills are developed within this major?

Skills developed within this major include: critical thinking, writing, complex problem solving, clear and concise communication, agility of mind, and the capacity for continued new learning.

Admission to Major


No requirement other than good academic standing in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences.

Hours Required for Degree


Minimum hours required for degree: 120

Minimum hours required for major: 33

Minimum hours required for residency: 17

Major-Field Requirements


Pre-Law Track


Capstone Course: 3 credits (select one of the following)

Electives: 12 credit hours


Students must complete four other philosophy elective courses, at least two of which must be at the 300- to 400-level.

Students may also count the following course from criminology toward the pre-law track upper-level elective requirements:

GPA


The average GPA for all Philosophy courses must be a C (2.0) or better.

Ethics Track


Capstone Course: 3 credits (choose one of the following)

History of Philosophy Elective: 3 credit hours (select one of the following courses)


Applied Ethics Electives: 3 credit hours (select one of the following courses)


Electives: 18 credit hours


Students must complete six other philosophy elective courses, at least four of which must be at the 300- to 400-level.

Students may also count up to TWO of the following courses from other disciplines toward the ethics track upper-level elective requirements:

GPA


The average GPA for all Philosophy courses must be a C (2.0) or better.

Traditional Track


Core Courses: 12 credit hours


Electives: 21 credit hours


Students must complete seven other philosophy elective courses, at least four of which must be at the 300- to 400-level.

Students may also count up to TWO of the following courses from other disciplines toward the traditional track upper-level elective requirements:

GPA


The average GPA for all Philosophy courses must be a C (2.0) or better.

Philosophy Honors Program


Students must complete 9 hours of honors credits AND do an independent research project.

The 9 honors hours can be met by:

  • taking honors courses in philosophy;
  • doing up to 4 hours of independent research or
  • contracting a philosophy course to make it into an honors course.

These credits can all be used towards the regular major, so this does NOT require the student to take more than the normal 33 hours.

Accelerated 3+3 Degree


The CSU/Cleveland-Marshall College of Law 3+3 program permits a student who has completed three years of undergraduate study to be admitted to the College of Law to begin J.D. studies. The undergraduate degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the first full year of the J.D. curriculum, thus permitting the student to graduate with both an undergraduate and law degrees in six rather than seven years of full-time study (or its equivalent). In effect, the first year of law school completes the fourth year of the undergraduate degree (serving, in effect, as undergraduate elective courses) and serves as the first year of law school. This arrangement saves both time and money for the student.