Jul 05, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2021 - 2022 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2021 - 2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]


Music, B.A.



Description

Music provides a comprehensive education in music at both undergraduate and graduate levels, and at the same time serves as a presenter of concerts, recitals, seminars, master classes and workshops for the campus community and the region. All students will be immersed in Music theory, Musicianship, instrumental/voice skills, and Music History.

What careers can this major prepare you for?

Music majors find themselves in many different careers, including: Performance artist, Arts Administrator, Community Arts Worker, Music Therapist, Event Manager, Music Teacher, Accompanists in various settings, Audio Production, Band/Choral Director, Composer, Conductor, Entertainment industry, Historian, Instrument Builder/Designer, College Professor, Librarian, Promoter, Song Writer/Producer

What skills are developed within this major?

Music majors understand styles and structures of music and apply this knowledge through performace. They connect to social trends and history, develop self-confidence and self-discipline, learn cooperatively, problem solve and creatively express themselves. Higher level Organization and Management skills are developed.

Admission to Major


Acceptance into the B.A. program in Music requires an interview with the program adviser and written confirmation from the program adviser of the student’s acceptance as a candidate for the B.A. in Music. A successful entrance audition before a faculty committee is required of students whose focus in the B.A. program is to be performance. An entrance audition will also be required of applicants who have less than one year of private applied lessons at a recognized institution of higher education.

Private lessons in applied music are offered on campus. Students may register for either one or two half-hour weekly lessons. The last digit of the applied music course number indicates the amount of credit earned. Those who register for one half-hour lesson earn one semester hour; two half-hour lessons earn two semester hours. Special tuition fees are assessed for these courses. A successful performance audition is required for admission to music major status.

Hours Required for Degree


Minimum hours required for B.A.: 58

Major-Field Requirements


The Bachelor of Arts with a major in music is designed for the student who seeks to study music in its wider cultural context.

All music students are urged to consult the School of Music Student Handbook online for further clarification of the degree requirements listed below. The handbook contains full details and explanations of school and degree requirements.

2. In addition, the B. A. requires applied music and/or ensemble participation as follows (8 hours)


Students must complete eight credit hours of ensembles (MUS 100-level) or lessons (MUA 100-level).

3. Electives (18 hours)


Students must complete 18 elective credits in music, at least 15 of which must be at the 300/400 level (see list of Music electives below).

Although a student is free to complete the major requirements with any combination of Music electives, the school believes that the major program is greatly strengthened and better organized when there is a judicious selection of electives. The school makes available to every student who declares a major in Music an Undergraduate Advisor. The student is expected to plan a total academic program with the assistance of the school advisor.

Honors Program Requirements


Students who have been admitted to the University Honors Program with a major in music must earn eight credits from the courses listed below in addition to the Honors Program core requirements in order to graduate with honors in Music.

The honors designation for each of the courses listed below involves additional requirements as follows:

MUS 411HC and 412HC. In addition to the scheduled class time, Honors students will attend two graduate music history seminars at CSU and three musicological colloquia at Case Western Reserve University or a local American Musicological Society chapter meeting. Honors students will also meet three times with the instructor to discuss their final project. The final project must be longer than the ones of their peers and must demonstrate a more in-depth, rigorous, and analytical approach to the topic, similar to what is expected at the graduate level. Honors students are expected to use additional scholarly literature in comparison to their peers. To earn extra-credit, a student may also opt to write “applied” music history that would provide program notes for university ensemble concerts, or reviews of performances that could be submitted for publication in campus newspapers.

MUS 414. Honors students, contracting MUS 414, will write a more extensive paper than their peers. Through additional research, honors students will be involved more thoroughly with their selected research projects. By regularly meeting with the instructor, they will develop more refined research tools than their peers. They will also read additional, subject-specific material assigned by the instructor and discuss these readings with the instructor.

MUS 482HC or MUS 485HC. In addition to the regular required senior recital, honors students will present to the public a lecture pertaining to the repertory that will be performed. These presentations can be guided listening presentations, short historical or analytical perspectives or explanations of technical problems that were confronted in learning a particular piece.

Select one of the following two courses:


  • MUS 482HC Honors Full Recital 2
  • MUS 485HC Honors Composition Recital 2

University Scholars Requirements


Students who have been admitted to the University Scholars Program with a major in music must earn six credits from the courses below to earn Scholars Distinction in Music.

The Scholars designation for each of the courses listed below involves additional requirements as follows:

MUS 411HC and 412HC. In addition to the scheduled class time, Scholars students will attend two graduate music history seminars at CSU and three musicological colloquia at Case Western Reserve University or a local American Musicological Society chapter meeting. Scholars students will also meet three times with the instructor to discuss their final project. The final project must be longer than the ones of their peers and must demonstrate a more in-depth, rigorous, and analytical approach to the topic, similar to what is expected at the graduate level. Scholars students are expected to use additional scholarly literature in comparison to their peers. To earn extra-credit, a student may also opt to write “applied” music history that would provide program notes for university ensemble concerts, or reviews of performances that could be submitted for publication in campus newspapers.

MUS 414. Scholars students, contracting MUS 414, will write a more extensive paper than their peers. Through additional research, scholars students will be involved more thoroughly with their selected research projects. By regularly meeting with the instructor, they will develop more refined research tools than their peers. They will also read additional, subject-specific material assigned by the instructor and discuss these readings with the instructor.